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Category: Media & Communications

Kluge Center's Dan Turello interviewing Gene Zubovich

How Liberal Protestants Shaped America, Part 2

Posted by: Andrew Breiner

This is part two of our interview with Gene Zubovich. For the first part, click here. What drew the attention of activist Protestants towards international affairs, and what impact did that have? In Before the Religious Right I discuss the work liberal Protestants were doing to fight racism, economic inequality, and to reshape American foreign …

Image of Gene Zubovich

How Liberal Protestant Activists Shaped America

Posted by: Andrew Breiner

Gene Zubovich is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, as well as a Kluge Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. He is the author of “Before the Religious Right.”  On April 19, 2022 at 4pm, Zubovich will discuss “Before the Religious …

Image of Kluge Director Brent Yacobucci interviewing Tamika Y. Nunley

Navigating Liberty’s Promise: Black Women in Washington, DC and the End of Slavery

Posted by: Andrew Breiner

Nineteenth-century Washington, DC was home to thousands of enslaved people, as well as a hotbed of abolitionist activism. Black women were subject to incredible levels of legal and social restriction, but found ways to make their own lives within that world. Historian Tamika Nunley’s latest book, At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting …

Image of Colin Powell and Madeleine Albright at Library's Kluge Center and the Daniel K. Inouye Institute event

The Kluge Center Remembers Colin Powell and Madeleine Albright

Posted by: Dan Turello

In 2015, the Inaugural Daniel K. Inouye Lecture featured Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell. We highlight it here again, in memory of two dedicated patriots and public servants who exemplified the spirit of dialogue across partisan divides. For more on the legacy of Madeleine Albright, read this post on the Library of Congress blog.

Sweeping view from the floor of a great room, looking upwards past marble columns and arches to a grand golden-colored dome

How the Web Remembers: Cookies, Characters, and Consent

Posted by: Sophia Zahner

Meg Jones is a Kluge Fellow as well as Associate Professor in the Communication, Culture & Technology program at Georgetown University where she researches rules and technological change with a focus on privacy, memory, innovation, and automation in digital information and computing technologies. “Ctrl+Z: The Right to be Forgotten,” Meg’s first book, is about the …

Image of the webinar on the Maritime Underground Railroad

Celebrating Black History Month at the John W. Kluge Center

Posted by: Andrew Breiner

The John W. Kluge Center has had the privilege of hosting many scholars of Black history, who have shared their expertise with the public in events, blog posts, and podcasts. As Black History Month 2022 comes to a close, we are taking the opportunity to highlight opportunities to learn about Black history from our recent …

Image of Pillars of Democracy Webinar on Electoral Institutions

Key Topics for Pillars of Democracy – Electoral Institutions

Posted by: Andrew Breiner

On Thursday, January 20, at 4pm, the John W. Kluge Center, the American Enterprise Institute, and the Brookings Institution will co-host a discussion of electoral institutions and how they have become so distrusted. Click here to register and to read the full bios of the participants. Ahead of that event, we’re sharing recent articles and …

Sweeping view from the floor of a great room, looking upwards past marble columns and arches to a grand golden-colored dome

What’s Behind the Idea of a Partisan Judiciary?

Posted by: Andrew Breiner

On September 30, the John W. Kluge Center, the Brookings Institution, and the American Enterprise Institute, convened the latest panel discussion in the Pillars of Democracy series, this one on the causes of changing attitudes towards the federal judiciary, as well as the ways that the third branch of government can win Americans’ trust back. …