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Steve Swayne Joins John W. Kluge Center as Chair in Modern Culture

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is pleased to announce the appointment of Steve Swayne as Chair in Modern Culture. Swayne, who began his residency in March, is working with the Library’s David Diamond Collection to produce a book on the life and work of the influential 20th century American composer.

Swayne is the Jacob H. Strauss 1922 Professor of Music at Dartmouth College, where he teaches courses in art music from 1700 to the present day, opera, American musical theater, Russian music, and American music. Swayne is President of the American Musicological Society, the premier organization for musicologists in the English-speaking world as well as an accomplished concert pianist. Swayne completed his PhD at UC Berkeley in 1999.

Swayne has received fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. His articles have appeared in The Sondheim Review, the Journal of the Royal Musical Association, American Music, Studies in Musical Theatre, the Indiana Theory Review, and The Musical Quarterly. Swayne has written two books—“How Sondheim Found His Sound” (University of Michigan Press, 2005) and “Orpheus in Manhattan: William Schuman and the Shaping of America’s Musical Life” (Oxford University Press, 2011; winner of the 2012 ASCAP Nicolas Slonimsky Award for Outstanding Musical Biography).

In 2017, Swayne was an inaugural recipient of the Professor John Rassias Faculty Award, given to faculty for their exceptional educational outreach to alumni. In addition to Dartmouth, he has taught at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music; the University of California, Berkeley; and Quest University.

 

Thérèse Bonney: Curator, Photographer, Syndicator, Spy

This is a guest post by Kluge Center Research Assistant Sophia Zahner, an interview with 2021 Kluge Fellow Caroline Riley. Riley is also a Research Associate at the University of California, Davis. Sophia Zahner: How did you become interested in the photography of Thérèse Bonney? How does it relate to your other research projects? Caroline […]

Our Common Purpose: The Complete Collection

In June 2020, the Kluge Center announced Danielle Allen as the winner of the Kluge Prize, launching the Our Common Purpose Campaign for Civic Strength at the Library of Congress. Allen hosted a series of exciting conversations at the Library to explore the nation’s civic life and ways that people from all political beliefs and […]

Visualizing “Our Common Purpose”

This is a guest post by Lee Ann Potter, Director of Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives at  the Library of Congress Center for Learning, Literacy, & Engagement. “Our Common Purpose—A Campaign for Civic Strength at the Library of Congress,” a wealth of activities at the Library this spring. The theme, chosen by Danielle Allen, winner […]

Nahuatl Passion Plays in the Colonial Era: An Interview With Louise Burkhart

Louise M. Burkhart is Professor of Anthropology at the State University of New York at Albany as well as Jay I. Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas at the John W. Kluge Center. Andrew Breiner: Could you start by telling me a little about your background and […]

Scholar Spotlight: Carla Freeman and Sarah Smeed on the Women Who Have Inspired Them

Women have made incredible strides forward in academia. In 2018, 53% of the 79,000 doctoral degrees in the United States were awarded to women. That said, women still face unique challenges when faced with life after the Ph.D. During March, which is Women’s History Month, the Library, in partnership with the National Archives and Records […]

Did the Earliest Printers Know What Print Was? What a 15th Century Book from the Netherlands Can Tell Us About Culture and Innovation

This is a guest post by Kluge Fellow Anna Dlabacova, Assistant Professor and postdoctoral researcher at Leiden University. She is researching a project titled “Inspiring, Innovative, and Influential: The Role of Gerard Leeu’s Incunabula in Late Medieval Spirituality and Devotional Practice.” She hopes to advance study on the role that incunabula from the Netherlands played […]

Parallel Worlds and the Digital Age: Representing Audio Collections with Digital Data at the American Folklife Center and Beyond

This is a guest post by Patrick Egan (Pádraig Mac Aodhgáin), a researcher and musician from Ireland, former Kluge Center Fellow in Digital Studies and currently on a Fulbright Tech Impact scholarship. He recently submitted his PhD in digital humanities with ethnomusicology to University College Cork. Patrick’s interests over the past number of years have […]

A Route of Her Own: Women’s Road Narratives in the Library of Congress

This is a guest post by Catherine Morgan-Proux, a French Association of American Studies (AEFA) Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center, from the Université Clermont Auvergne. She is working on a project titled “The Road She Travelled: 20th Century Cultural Representations of Women on the Road.” Morgan-Proux’s work is done as part of The […]

What Did Ancient Americans Find Funny?

Stephen Houston is the Library of Congress Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas, as well as Dupee Family Professor of Social Science at Brown University. In the lead-up to Professor Houston’s April 25 event at the Library, titled “Flint, Shield, and Fire: Exploring Ancient Maya Warfare,” I […]