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The Library of Congress and GPO Working Together

One primary area that I work on is THOMAS and legislative information.  Because of that, I am very pleased to announce several joint initiatives between the Library of Congress and the Government Printing Office (GPO).  I’ve met a lot of great people at GPO over the last few months as some of the details of these initiatives have been worked out.

GPO is being authorized to provide enhanced public online access to historical volumes of Statutes at Large and the Congressional Record.  These projects will be a collaborative effort between GPO and the Library of Congress.

The first project involves digitized volumes of the Statutes at Large, dating from 1951 to 2002.  Robust searching and content management tools will be developed for these volumes.  Archival and access copies with digitally signed pages will be incorporated, and access to these volumes will then be available online through both GPO’s Federal Digital System (FDsys) and the Library of Congress.

The second project involves digitized volumes of the Congressional Record dating from 1873 to 1998.  Digital files with search functions, content management capabilities, and digital authentication will be created and then published online through FDsys and the Library of Congress.

I’ll try to provide an update as more detailed information about this work becomes available.

Speaking of GPO, THOMAS now has a link to FDsys for the Constitutional Authority Statements for H.R. and H.J.Res for the current Congress on the Bill Summary and Status pages.

One Comment

  1. ernie1241
    March 9, 2011 at 10:18 am

    The forthcoming availability of the Congressional Record 1873-1998 on-line will become a major asset for all researchers and students of government.

    Many city libraries have only recent years of the CR in their holdings — and, often, the CR contains reprints of newspaper/magazine articles which are no longer available — so thanks VERY MUCH for doing this.

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