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Join Us on November 21 for a Discussion of “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”

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The Law Library of Congress will host a program on America’s favorite ghost story – Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow  on Thursday, November 21. 

 

Washington Irving (1783–1859). The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. New York and London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1899. Margaret Armstrong Collection, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress (013.00.00)
Washington Irving (1783–1859). The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. New York and London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1899. Margaret Armstrong Collection, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress (013.00.00)

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, listed as one of the Books that Shaped America by the Library of Congress, was first written by Irving in his collection of essays and short stories, The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.  First published in 1820, it is a seasonal favorite and one of the first books by a U.S. author to gain international popularity. The discussion, led by Professor Lewis Grossman of American University’s Washington College of Law (WCL), will cover topics such as the story’s messages about capitalism, law, American identity, and the function of storytelling.

Grossman teaches and specializes in American legal history, civil procedure and food and drug law. Prior to joining the faculty of WCL, he was an associate at the D.C. firm of Covington & Burling.  He also clerked for Chief Judge Abner Mikva, U.S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit.

Grossman’s latest work includes Food and Drug Law: Cases and Materials 3rd ed. (Foundation Press 2007, coauthored with Peter Barton Hutt and Richard A. Merrill) (4th ed. Expected 2013).  Additionally, he is writing a book tentatively titled You Can Choose Your Medicine: Freedom of Therapeutic Choice in American Law and History.  Grossman’s many articles have appeared in journals such as Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law & Ethics; Cornell Law Review; and Law and History Review.

The lunchtime event will begin at 12:00 p.m. in the Copyright Hearing Room (LM-408), located on the fourth floor of the Library’s James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, D.C. The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited.  Tickets are not required.

Update: The event video was added below.

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