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Feudalism, Magna Carta and King John – Pic of the Week

On Wednesday, I gave a gallery talk for the Magna Carta: Muse and Mentor Exhibition.  I focused the talk around King John and his rapacious habits as a ruler: demanding extraordinary fees from his feudal vassals, seizing hostages, and losing battles.  I also included some information on the Constitutions of Clarendon (more on that in another post).  My good friend David attended and took a photograph of me expounding on these topics, which you can see below.

If you were unable to make it to the Library of Congress to see my gallery talk, do not despair.  We have several interesting gallery talks coming up in the weeks to come, including:

December 10, 2014. James Martin, a senior legal information analyst in the Law Library of Congress, presents “The Merriman Case and the Writ of Habeas Corpus.” The program will take place in the South Gallery, on the second floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from 12:00 p.m. until 1:00 p.m.

January 7, 2015. Robert Brammer, Law Library, and Eiichi Ito, Asian Division, co-present on military authority and the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The program will take place in the South Gallery, on the second floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from 12:00 p.m. until 1:00 p.m.

January 14, 2015. Nathan Dorn, exhibition curator, will discuss highlights of selected items from the exhibition. The program will take place in the South Gallery, on the second floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from 12:00 p.m. until 1:00 p.m.

 

Gallery Talk by Margaret Wood / Photograph by David S. Deutsch

Gallery Talk by Margaret Wood / Photograph by David S. Deutsch

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