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Crossing State Lines to Settle Squabbles – Pic of the Week

Today’s guest post is by Janice Hyde, director of the Law Library Global Legal Collection Directorate. In a previous post prepared by my colleague Robert Brammer, he noted that Kentucky outlawed dueling in 1799. I learned recently that this practice was legal for many more years in the District of Columbia and for even longer […]

Establishing the Smithsonian Institution

The sight of construction cranes in Washington DC is nothing new; the city is constantly changing and renewing.  The cranes and I-beams peeking above the trees near the Washington Monument hearken the arrival of the newest Smithsonian museum: the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NAAHC).  In the 15 years I’ve been in […]

Accessing Reading Room Materials During Our Move

This is a guest post by Anne Guha, legal information analyst with the Law Library Public Services Division. As Margaret explained in a previous blog post, recently we have been preparing the Law Library Reading Room, located in Room 201 in the Madison Building of the Library of Congress, for a much-needed renovation.  In order to allow the […]

Researching Norwegian Law Online and in the Library

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law research consultant who covers Scandinavian countries at the Law Library of Congress. Elin has previously written about the bicentenary of Norway’s constitution and a boarding school scandal in Sweden for In Custodia Legis. When I conduct research on Scandinavian jurisdictions here at the […]

Congress.gov: Removing the Beta Label and New Enhancements

The Library of Congress launched Congress.gov in beta two years ago.  Today, I’m happy to announce we officially removed the beta label. That’s roughly three years quicker than Gmail took to remove its beta label, but we won’t give you the option of putting it back on Congress.gov.  URLs that include beta.Congress.gov will be redirected […]

Magna Carta Event Celebrates Constitution Day

The Law Library hosted Yale Law School constitutional scholar Akhil Reed Amar in commemoration of Constitution Day on Tuesday, September 16. Professor Amar’s lecture, “Magna Carta and the United States Constitution,” celebrated the signing of the United States Constitution 227 years ago on Sept. 17, 1787 and served as the third lecture in the Magna Carta […]

What Do I Wear to Court?: Courtroom Appearance and Decorum Standards

Periodically, we hear about news stories in which an attorney, a party in a legal case, or even a courtroom spectator, find themselves in hot water for not meeting certain courtroom attendance standards.  Apart from avoiding the wrath of judges, appearance can also apparently have an an effect on the outcome of a trial.  In […]