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How Do You Say “Law” in…?

I work in an amazing place. We sometimes refer to it as a mini United Nations because we have staff from around the globe.  Our Global Legal Research Directorate provides a wealth of foreign, international, and comparative reports for Congress.  You can access our foreign law reference collection in the Global Legal Resource Room. There is also a series of posts, Global Legal Collection Highlights, which feature resources in our collection for a specific jurisdiction.

As we are the Law Library of Congress, I thought it would be nice to ask staff to say the word in their native language.

How do you say “Law” in…?

  • Prawo in Polish by Agata and Aga
  • Direito in Portuguese by Eduardo
  • Droit in French by Nicolas
  • قانون (Qanoun) in Arabic by George
  • قانون (Kanoon) in Urdu by Tariq
  • Recht in German by Jenny
  • право in Russian by Peter
  • ሕጊ (hgi) in Tigrinya by Hanibal
  • 法律 (Fa Lü) in Chinese by Laney
  • Derecho in Spanish by Francisco
  • আইন (Ā’ina) in Bengali by Shameema
  • משפט (Mishpat) in Hebrew by Ruth

If your native language is different from any of the ones listed here (and there are a lot of them), please share the word for law and the language below.

6 Comments

  1. Gabriel Balayan
    June 10, 2016 at 11:14 am

    Thanks for posting this video, what great memories I’ve experienced watching it.

    By the way, in Armenian it’s Iravunk [Իրավունք]

  2. justina.gr
    June 11, 2016 at 11:24 am

    Νόμος in Greek

  3. Antong KWOK
    June 12, 2016 at 9:09 am

    Hukum in Indonesia

  4. zana
    August 11, 2016 at 4:36 pm

    Knjižnica on Croatian

  5. Malou Gil
    May 2, 2017 at 6:13 am

    Philippines (Filipino language) it is ‘Batas’

  6. Marcial R. Batiancila
    September 11, 2018 at 12:58 am

    “Balaod” in Cebuano (Philippine language)

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