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New Law Library Reports Cover Access to Encrypted Communications and Intelligence Gathering

More and more internet traffic is encrypted. Encryption is a method of protecting electronic information by converting it into an unintelligible form (encoding) so that it can only be decoded with a key. Google stated in its latest transparency report that 85% of requests from around the world to Google’s servers used encrypted connections in […]

An Interview with Molly O’Casey, Foreign Law Intern

Today’s interview is with Molly O’Casey, a foreign law intern working with Nicolas Boring on research related to the laws of France and other French-speaking jurisdictions and with Clare Feikert-Ahalt on research related to the United Kingdom and a number of Commonwealth jurisdictions. Molly has recently graduated from a dual law degree (civil law/common law) […]

Law Library of Congress and Poetry and Literature Center to Host Award-Winning Poet Monica Youn

On the evening of Thursday, October 20, 2016, the Library of Congress will host award-winning poet and attorney Monica Youn. Youn will read from her latest collection of poetry, Blackacre (Graywolf Press, 2016), which has been longlisted for the National Book Award in Poetry. Youn will also participate in a conversation with Martha Dragich, professor […]

WWI Conscription and Conscientious Objectors in New Zealand

The following is a tale of World War I legal history with a literary twist.  (Working at the world’s largest library, with books on every subject, I could hardly leave the literary aspect out, could I?) I have previously written about New Zealand’s involvement in World War I, particularly in the Gallipoli campaign, and related […]