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Book Talk—Michael Signer to Discuss Founding Father: James Madison

Michael Signer. Photo by Cat Thrasher

On Tuesday, December 6, the Law Library of Congress and the Center for the Book will host a book talk featuring Michael Signer. He will discuss his book, Becoming Madison: The Extraordinary Origins of the Least Likely Founding Father (Public Affairs, 2015), which focuses on U.S. President James Madison’s life before age 36. After the discussion, Dr. Signer will be available to sign copies of his book.

This event is free and open to public, and will take place at noon in the Whittall Pavilion of the Thomas Jefferson Building.

Michael Signer is lecturer at the Batten School of Public Policy and Leadership at the University of Virginia, managing principal of Madison Law & Strategy Group, PLLC, and the Mayor of Charlottesville, Virginia. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from U.C., Berkeley, where he was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow; a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law; and a B.A. in politics from Princeton University.  He was counsel to then-Governor Mark Warner of Virginia; National Security Director of the 2008 John Edwards for President Campaign; Senior Policy Advisor at the Center for American Progress; and a candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Virginia in 2009.

Dr. Signer is also the author of Demagogue: The Fight to Save Democracy from Its Worst Enemies.  His writings have been published in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The New Republic, Democracy, The Richmond Times-Dispatch, and USA Today, and he has appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, the BBC, and NPR.

We hope you can join us for this event!

 

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