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Cornell University Law Library – Pic of the Week

I was in Ithaca, N.Y. recently for a meeting of the Northeast Foreign Law Libraries Cooperative Group (NEFLLCG) hosted by Cornell University Law Library. This group meets semiannually to discuss collection development issues, new acquisitions, and ensure the law collections in the region sufficiently represent foreign jurisdictions.

Cornell Law School. Photo by Kurt Carroll.

Whenever I attend a conference or meeting, in addition to the subject matter, I look forward to visiting the library spaces of the host institutions. The focal point of Cornell’s law library is the Gould Reading Room, named in honor of Eleanor and Milton S. Gould.

The Gould Reading Room, Cornell University Law Library. Photo by Kurt Carroll

4 Comments

  1. Warren E. Brown
    July 24, 2017 at 6:41 am

    24 July 2017

    Mr. Carroll,

    I thank you for sharing your photos from your visit at the Cornell Law School. The Gould reading room is particularly beautiful and inviting. I am interested in knowing more about the Gould family, as the name is believed to be connected with a manufacturer of wet cell batteries, and perhaps other electrical controls and / or components.

    My regards,

    Warren E. Brown, Esq.
    Washington, D. C.

    .

  2. Kurt Carroll
    July 24, 2017 at 9:33 am

    Mr. Brown, I am glad you enjoyed this post. Milton Gould received his bachelors degree from Cornell in 1930 and graduated from the Law School in 1933. He went on to enjoy a decades long legal career in New York City.

  3. Janet Odetsi Twum
    July 25, 2017 at 6:01 am

    Thank you for the photos. It is indeed a lovely place for learning

  4. Naffky~Bucklaew
    October 5, 2017 at 11:07 pm

    Those photos are wonderful…
    I believe I will need to take my
    grand~daughters for a visit.

    Chris Naffky~Bucklaew

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