{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

Congress.gov at the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park – Pic of the Week

Summer and travel go hand in hand.  A manager who oversees Congress.gov, Bill Kellum, was visiting the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park when he noticed the following legislation from the Library of Congress website.

H.R.267 – Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park Act of 2017 on display at the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park. Photo by Bill Kellum.

H.R.267 – Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park Act of 2017, sponsored by Representative John Lewis, became Public Law No: 115-108 on January 8, 2018.  Judging by the Congress.gov status of legislation tracker, the screenshot of the site was taken between December 27th when the legislation was presented to the president and January 8th when it was signed.

The National Park Service has a great site to plan your visit to the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park.

Have you visited someplace that has  legislation on display?  Share with us in the comments below.

One Comment

  1. W. Calvin Anderson
    August 2, 2018 at 8:58 pm

    This historic Act of 2017 sponsored by the Hon. John Lewis preserves for time immemorial in topography and landmark the civic virtue and political efforts of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his heroic and diverse patriots. In God We Trust; Out of One Many, indeed. Never has the understanding of the supreme supervision of these ideals and ideas been more precious than it is now, with reflections of King human story aligning with the steps of countless national and international men and women who will forever visit his memory — as a living undershepherd.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.