{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

A New Chinese Court in an Old American Building – Pic of the Week

A few months ago, I wrote a Global Legal Monitor article on a decision by China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee to create the country’s first financial court in Shanghai, the Shanghai Financial Court. According to the decision, the new court is specialized in handling financial cases. It has the status of an intermediate court and takes civil and commercial financial cases and finance-related administrative cases that were previously under the jurisdiction of the intermediate courts in Shanghai.

During a recent visit to Shanghai, I walked by this impressive American-style building and found it was the new Shanghai Financial Court! It is on Fuzhou Road, only a couple of blocks from the Bund (Wai Tan), a waterfront neighborhood that used to be the trade and financial center in Shanghai.

Shanghai Financial Court. [Photo by Laney Zhang]

Shanghai Financial Court. [Photo by Laney Zhang]

Shanghai Financial Court, front door. [Photo by Laney Zhang]

Shanghai Financial Court, front door. [Photo by Laney Zhang]

According to the “heritage architecture” plaque mounted on the outside wall of the court, the building used to be an “American Club,” designed by “Ladislaus Hudec of Curry & Co.” and built in 1923-25. It is in “American Georgian style,” according to the plaque.

Plaque on the outside wall of Shanghai Financial Court, commemorating American Club. [Photo by Laney Zhang]

Plaque on the outside wall of Shanghai Financial Court, commemorating the American Club. [Photo by Laney Zhang]

Check this map of Shanghai dated 1935, collected by the Boston Public Library, and see if you could find the American Club! (It is on “Foochow Road,” opposite of the “Municipal Building” in this map.)

The Shanghai Financial Court reportedly opened its doors on August 20, 2018, and heard its first case on October 18, 2018.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.