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Most Viewed Law Library Foreign Law Reports of 2018

The In Custodia Legis team has developed a tradition of looking back and reporting on those foreign law reports published that year on the Law Library of Congress website. Our team members also routinely review and report on the most viewed foreign law reports, Global Legal Monitor articles, and In Custodia Legis posts during the passed year.

During 2018, Hanibal and I introduced two new reports in two separate blog posts:

Library Of Congress. Photoduplication Service, photographer. Clearance of report with Section Chief. Dr. Arahag O. Sarkissian, Analyst, European Affairs; Dr. Merlin H. Nipe, Deputy Assistant Director and Chief of History and General Research Section. , 1951. Photograph. //www.loc.gov/item/2009631245/.

Library Of Congress. Photoduplication Service, photographer. Clearance of report with Section Chief. Dr. Arahag O. Sarkissian, Analyst, European Affairs; Dr. Merlin H. Nipe, Deputy Assistant Director and Chief of History and General Research Section, 1951. Photograph. //www.loc.gov/item/2009631245/.

Additional foreign law reports published by the Law Library during 2018 include:

The most viewed foreign law reports during 2018 almost mirror those identified as most viewed in 2017. They cover similar topics such as firearm control legislation and policy, children’s rights and issues relating to citizenship and refugees. Below are the 15 foreign law reports that received the most views in 2018.

Stay tuned for more reports in 2019! If you want to find out when we publish new reports in 2019, subscribe to an email alert or to the RSS feed. We also tweet when new reports go online. Follow the Law Library’s Twitter account, @LawLibCongress. We will do our best to inform you of new foreign law reports on In Custodia Legis as well.

Happy 2019!

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