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Finding the Influence of Thomas Jefferson in an Antebellum Ruin in Barboursville, Virginia

You are looking at the ruins of James Barbour’s mansion, which was completed in 1822 and destroyed by fire on Christmas Day in 1884. James Barbour enjoyed an impressive career, serving as a member in the Virginia House of Delegates, the 18th Governor of Virginia, a U.S. Senator, the U.S. Secretary of War, and the […]

Japanese Criminal Legal System as Seen Through the Carlos Ghosn Case

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a senior foreign law specialist who covers Japan and various other countries in East and Southeast Asia. Sayuri has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including Disciplining Judges for “Bad Tweets”, Engagement under Japanese Law and Imperial House Rules, Is the Sound of Children Actually Noise?, How to Boost your Medal Count in […]

Published Works Enter the Public Domain in the United States for First Time in Twenty Years

The following is a repost from the Copyright Office blog, Creativity at Work. This is a guest post by Anandashankar Mazumdar, outreach and education specialist in the Office of Public Information and Education. New Year’s Day 2019 was a landmark for American copyright law. For the first time in twenty years, published works of expression—including […]

Happy National Spaghetti Day!

Today, January 4, is National Spaghetti Day. And no one appreciates pasta more than the self-proclaimed “Pastafarians,” members of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM). According to their website, they believe, among others things, that “[p]irates were the original Pastafarians”, that “the Flying Spaghetti Monster created the world much as it exists today, but for […]