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Martha Nussbaum on Philosophy and Life: The 2019 Kellogg Biennial Lecture in Jurisprudence

Philosopher Martha C. Nussbaum will be the featured speaker at the 2019 Kellogg Biennial Lecture in Jurisprudence at the Library of Congress. Photo courtesy of Martha C. Nussbaum.

Philosopher Martha C. Nussbaum will be the featured speaker at the 2019 Kellogg Biennial Lecture in Jurisprudence at the Library of Congress. Photo courtesy of Martha C. Nussbaum.

UPDATE: We regret to announce the cancellation of the 2019 Kellogg Lecture. The lecture will be rescheduled to a date in 2020.

Announcements for the new date will be posted to the Law Library’s blog, sent via our News & Events email list, and posted as a new Eventbrite page.

We hope that you will join us next year.

 

Join us for the 2019 Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg Biennial Lecture in Jurisprudence!

Philosopher Martha C. Nussbaum will be the featured speaker for the 10th anniversary of the event on Wednesday, December 4 at 5:00 p.m. Brian Butler, professor of philosophy and legal scholar at the University of North Carolina Asheville, will interview Professor Nussbaum on “Philosophy and Life: Fragility, Emotions, Capabilities.” A question-and-answer period will follow.

Register at kellogg2019.eventbrite.com. We recommend reserving your tickets early, as these will go quickly and space is limited! We will not livestream this event, so you will want to be in the room!

Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics appointed in both the Law School and Philosophy Department at the University of Chicago, where she is also an Associate in the Classics Department, the Divinity School, and the Political Science Department; a Member of the Committee on Southern Asian Studies; and a Board Member of the Human Rights Program. Among her awards is the Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture, which she won in 2018.

Read her full biography in the press release.

A selection of Nussbaum’s books held by the Library of Congress include:

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