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The Constitution Annotated—Impeachment Clauses

This guest post is by the Law Library’s Chief of the Public Services Division, Andrew Winston. Andrew has written several posts for the blog, including Federal Courts Web Archive Launched, A Visit to the Peace Palace Library, and The Revised Statutes of the United States: Predecessor to the U.S. Code.

Beyond the Constitution Annotated: Table of Additional Resources

Beyond the Constitution Annotated: Table of Additional Resources

The Library of Congress has updated the Constitution Annotated essays pertaining to impeachment and incorporated them in the annotations to Article I, Article II, and Article III of the Constitution. In addition, the updated impeachment essays are consolidated in Resources about Impeachment.  Additional information on impeachment is available on the website’s Beyond the Constitution Annotated: Table of Additional Resources under Resources.

The Library of Congress launched the Constitution Annotated on Constitution Day, September 17, 2019. The website provides online access to the “Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation,” which has served as Congress’s official record of the Constitution for over a century and explains in layman’s terms the Constitution’s origins, how the nation’s most important law was crafted and ratified, and how every provision in the Constitution has been interpreted. With advanced search tools and a modern, user-friendly interface, the new website makes the 3,000 pages of the Constitution Annotated fully searchable and accessible for the first time to online audiences—including Congress, legal scholars, law students, and anyone interested in U.S. constitutional law.

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