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Join Us on February 27th for a Webinar on the Upcoming Israeli Election

What You Need to Know About the Upcoming Israeli National Election, Thursday, 27 February 2020, 10:am. Join Ruth Levush as she discusses: the upcoming election in Israel; the process of forming a coalition government; the Prime Minister's indictment, and other issues

Flyer announcing upcoming webinar on Israeli national election, created by Susan Taylor-Pikulsky

On March 2, 2020, Israel is going to hold its third national election in 11 months, with the first having taken place on April 9, 2019, and the second on September 17, 2019. The current (22nd) Knesset (Israel’s parliament) was sworn in on October 3, 2019.

Israel maintains a parliamentary system of government. No Knesset member was successful in forming a government following the first two elections. Therefore, the 34th Government, which was sworn in on May 14, 2015, continues to serve beyond its term of office as an interim-government, subject to changes to ministerial portfolios made by the Prime Minister.

Please join us for the second installment in our foreign and comparative law webinar series, What You Need to Know About the Upcoming Israeli National Election at 10am on February 27, 2020. I will discuss general principles of the Israeli government system, rules governing national elections, the method of distribution of Knesset seats, government formation procedures, prime-ministerial qualifications, term limits, authorities of interim governments and the legal implications of an indictment against a candidate or a serving prime minister on government formation and term of office. Topics may be adjusted as warranted to address ongoing developments.

To register, please click here or call (202) 707-5080.

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