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The Constitution Annotated Online Celebrates Its First Anniversary

This is a guest post by Jeanne Dennis, Acting Assistant Director of the American Law Division of the Congressional Research Service. Last Constitution Day, September 17, 2019, the Library launched constitution.congress.gov, a new website for Congress’s official record of the Constitution: The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation. For over 100 […]

New Report Examines the Regulation of the Sale of Wild Animals and Their Meat in Markets Around the World

When a novel coronavirus was first reported as having been contracted by people in Wuhan, China, in  December 2019, there was a lot of discussion about the potential source of the virus. On January 12, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a statement saying that “[t]he evidence is highly suggestive that the outbreak is […]

From the Serial Set: Residency, Race, and Suffrage

Congress has dealt with issues of voter disenfranchisement on the basis of race throughout history. The question of suffrage for District of Columbia residents in 1844 demonstrated how the enfranchisement of D.C. residents and Black American men was interconnected. In that year, the Senate Committee for the District of Columbia, which held jurisdiction over D.C. from 1816 until […]

Join Us on September 24 for a Foreign and Comparative Law Webinar on “Worlds Apart: Legal Responses to COVID-19 in New Zealand and Sweden”

Please join us for the Law Library’s upcoming webinar: “Worlds Apart: Legal Responses to COVID-19 in New Zealand and Sweden” at 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, September 24, 2020. This webinar is the latest installment in the Law Library’s series of webinars focused on foreign and comparative law. In this webinar, we will discuss and compare the overarching policies and approaches of the two countries, outline the relevant laws, and a look at how the two governments have communicated with the public about the pandemic and the approaches taken.

Introducing the New Civic Education Models Report

This is a guest post by Kayahan Cantekin, a foreign law specialist in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. In many countries around the world, discussions on whether and how to reopen schools continue to preoccupy people, especially in light of the unpredictable nature of the COVID-19 pandemic. Here in […]

Digital Collection of the Gazette of Eritrean Laws Goes Live

Eritrea is one of the most difficult African jurisdictions for which to conduct legal research. This is primarily because the country’s laws are not easily accessible. While a few proclamations and notices have been uploaded to various websites piecemeal, there is not a central location where researchers can access the laws of the country for […]

From the Serial Set: The History of the Minimum Wage

The following is a guest post by Elina Lee, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. In honor of Labor Day, we decided to explore the early history of the federal minimum wage as shown through the United States Congressional Serial Set. According to Serial Set Vol. No. 6857 […]

75th Anniversary of End of World War II

On this day in 1945, the most destructive war in human history came to an end when representatives of the Japanese government signed the instrument of surrender on board the deck of the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. Overseeing the event was General of the Army and Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers Douglas MacArthur.   Representatives of […]