{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

Join Us on 4/14 for our Webinar: “Sustainable Finance – European Green Bonds and the ECB’s Climate Change Agenda”

In 2015, governments around the world adopted the Paris Agreement on climate change and the United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The financial system can contribute to implementing the commitments undertaken and achieving sustainability and climate-related objectives. Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) investing has been gaining traction among investors over the past decade and is a leading form of sustainable finance. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently proposed rules to enhance and standardize climate-related disclosures for investors. However, challenges remain, in particular with regard to the comparability of ESG criteria, because there are no uniform definitions of green or sustainable investments. The EU, for example, has therefore developed a classification system (EU taxonomy) that would provide companies, investors, and policymakers with the tools to judge which economic activities can be considered environmentally sustainable.

Flyer announcing upcoming foreign law webinar, created by Susan Taylor-Pikulsky.

Please join us for the Law Library’s upcoming webinar Sustainable Finance – European Green Bonds and the ECB’s Climate Change Agenda at 2pm EDT on Thursday, April 14, 2022. This webinar is the latest installment in the Law Library’s series of webinars focused on foreign and comparative law. It will discuss green and sustainable finance with a focus on measures in the European Union (EU). In its 2018 action plan on financing sustainable growth, the European Commission set out the EU strategy to connect finance with sustainability. In particular, the webinar will discuss the EU’s Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation, which contains transparency rules for financial market participants and financial advisers; the European Commission’s proposal to establish an official EU standard for green bonds; and the European Central Bank’s action plan to include climate change considerations in its monetary policy strategy. Similar proposals from other jurisdictions, such as Switzerland, will be highlighted.

The webinar will be presented by Jenny Gesley, foreign law specialist in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. Jenny holds a Master of Laws from the University of Minnesota Law School, a Juris Doctor equivalent from the Goethe University of FrankfurtGermany, and a doctorate in law. Her doctoral dissertation on “Financial Market Supervision in the United States: National Developments and International Standards” (in German) was awarded the Baker & McKenzie Award in 2015. Dr. Gesley is admitted to the New York State bar and is qualified to practice law in Germany.

To register for this webinar, please click here. Please request ADA accommodations at least five business days in advance by contacting (202) 707-6362 or [email protected].


Subscribe to In Custodia Legis – it’s free! – to receive interesting posts drawn from the Law Library of Congress’s vast collections and our staff’s expertise in U.S., foreign, and international law.

2 Comments

  1. Ines Liu
    March 24, 2022 at 10:30 pm

    Exactly, we used to say the financial management will be solely solution but cannot do any resilience at all, unless the economic ‘s roles in these. But currently we will need to make the financial systems and all of the reports to be exactly say what we have to take or not undertake. By this manifestation we will nearly to count our investments and earning more clearly and correctly. Reduce poverty will be one of the object we have to monitor and exactly mitiate.

  2. Ines Liu
    March 24, 2022 at 10:30 pm

    Exactly, we used to say the financial management will be solely solution but cannot do any resilience at all, unless the economic ‘s roles in these. But currently we will need to make the financial systems and all of the reports to be exactly say what we have to take or not undertake. By this manifestation we will neatly to count our investments and earning more clearly and correctly. Reduce poverty will be one of the object we have to monitor and exactly mitiate.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.