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Join us to Celebrate Law Day on April 28th at 3pm EDT

The theme of this year’s Law Day is “Toward a More Perfect Union: The Constitution in Times of Change.” The Law Library of Congress and the American Bar Association hope you can join us, via webinar, for this year’s Law Day celebration on April 28th at 3pm EDT. You can register here.

A poster for Law Day 2022, speakers for the event and schedule along the bottom. Title of the poster, "Toward a More Perfect Union: The Constitution in Times of Change."

We hope you can join us on April 28th at 3pm EDT to celebrate Law Day.

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union…” are the opening words of the U.S. Constitution. The Constitution a dynamic document, as it not only outlines a blueprint for government, but also delegates power, articulates rights, and offers mechanisms for change. Legislation, court rulings, amendments, attorneys, and “we the people” have built upon those original words across generations to attempt to make the “more perfect Union” more real. That effort continues today, as contemporary leaders and everyday citizens raise their voices as loud as ever to fulfill the promise of the Constitution. Defining and refining those words of the Constitution might be our oldest national tradition, and how each of us works—together—toward a more perfect Union.

This year’s Law Day panel will explore moments of constitutional change in the United States, especially in more recent years, looking at constitutional amendments, as well as social movements that led to legislation, shifts in U.S. Supreme Court jurisprudence, and other indicators of significant legal change.

This event will feature remarks by:
American Bar Association President Reginald M. Turner
Law Librarian of Congress Aslihan Bulut
National Law Day Chair Orlando Lucero

The panel includes:
Professor Wilfred Codrington, Brooklyn Law School
Professor Orin Kerr, University of California Berkeley School of Law 
Sophia Lin Lakin, American Civil Liberties Union Voting Rights Project
Elizabeth Slattery, Pacific Legal Foundation
Professor Stephen Wermiel, American University Washington College of Law

 

4 Comments

  1. Sherry Selover
    April 7, 2022 at 10:47 am

    It would be interesting to hear opinions on whether the constitution is feasible in today’s terms: high population, limited land, mineral, and climinate resources.

    Thank you,
    Sherry

  2. Julia Brooks-Goodwin
    April 7, 2022 at 12:59 pm

    Can you forward any resources and partnering groups and other information I need to join this webinar, if feasible, Also will there be a recap sent out?

    Thank you Ms Sherry for invite, it is greatly appreciated I
    am looking forward to joking event.

    Respectfully Submitted,

    Ms Julia Brooks-Goodwin

  3. Janet Haouchine
    April 11, 2022 at 10:37 am

    “A more perfect union” reminds me of the Ben Franklin series Ken Burns just put out for PBS. It was also featured via the Globe. I highly recommend the 4 one-hour segments.

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