Top of page

The Most Viewed Legal Research Reports and Global Legal Monitor Articles of 2022

Share this post:

The Law Library of Congress is unique in many ways. To accomplish our mission of providing authoritative legal research, reference, and instruction services, and access to an unrivaled collection of U.S., foreign, comparative, and international law, our staff includes foreign and U.S. trained legal specialists and law librarians from around the world who cover 300+ jurisdictions. Many of these foreign law specialists have a law degree from their country of origin and an LL.M. from a U.S. law school. The foreign law specialists write reports and provide expert witness testimony for Congress and various executive branch agencies. If the office requesting the report provides permission, these reports are made available online. You can access the Law Library’s reports by topicregionyear of publication, or you can simply browse all of the reports. These reports address specific legal issues for a particular country, or present a comparative multinational analysis of legal and legislative approaches to an individual problem in a variety of countries.

Our foreign law specialists and law librarians also write for the Global Legal Monitor, an online publication from the Law Library of Congress covering legal news and developments worldwide. You can access the Global Legal Monitor by topicjurisdiction, or author. In 2022, we published 271 Global Legal Monitor articles.

Here are the most-viewed reports and Global Legal Monitor articles that were published in 2022, in ascending order, starting with reports.

Most-viewed Reports

10. Mass timber construction in selected jurisdictions

9.  Mass timber construction

8.  United States and United Kingdom : comparative recent developments in environmental law

7.  Legal framework for nuclear technology and information : Australia, United Kingdom

6.  Net zero emissions legislation around the world : 2022 update

5.  Turkey : presidential decrees

4.  Economic espionage laws : Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, India, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Mongolia, Peru, South Korea, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan

3.  Worldwide Global Magnitsky Act legislation

2.  Investment migration programs of visa waiver program countries

1.  Laws on abortion, genetic consultation, and assisted reproduction


Black and white photograph looking down toward the sidewalk where a man stands in front of stacks of magazines
Magazine stand, Washington, D.C., 1938. Lee, Russell, photographer. Jan. 1938. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsa.8a22612

Most-viewed Global Legal Monitor articles

10. Philippines: Hague Convention on International Recovery of Child Support and Other Forms of Family Maintenance Signed

9.  United Arab Emirates: Israeli Citizen Sentenced to Death for Drug Trafficking in Abu Dhabi

8.  France: Law on Economic and Professional Gender Equality Adopted

7.  New Zealand: Bill Establishing Safe Areas around Abortion Facilities Passed

6.  Ukraine: Martial Law Introduced in Response to Russian Invasion

5.  Egypt: New Laws Regulating Marriage, Polygamy, and Divorce Proposed

4.  Germany: Tax Relief Measures Adopted to Offset High Energy Costs Due to War in Ukraine

3.  Italy: Single and Universal Allowance for Dependent Children Established

2.  France: Government Bans Single-Use Plastic Packaging for Various Perishable Products

1.  Canada: Bill C-4 Banning Conversion Therapy Comes into Force

Subscribe to In Custodia Legis – it’s free! – to receive interesting posts drawn from the Law Library of Congress’s vast collections and our staff’s expertise in U.S., foreign, and international law.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.


Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.