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Our New Reports on Regulation of Cryptocurrency Around the World

The Law Library of Congress often produces foreign, comparative, and international law reports on a wide range of issues. We recently completed two reports on the global cryptocurrency regulatory framework. While one of the reports is a compilation of brief surveys of the legal and policy landscape surrounding cryptocurrencies in 130 countries, the other one provides more […]

60 Years of Lego Building Blocks and Danish Patent Law

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, who covers Scandinavian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Elin’s previous posts include Finland: 100 Years of Independence – Global Legal Collection Highlights, Alfred Nobel’s Will: A Legal Document that Might Have Changed the World and a Man’s Legacy, Swedish Detention Order Regarding Julian Assange, The Masquerade King and […]

Worst. Birthday. Ever. Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands, United States Territories

After Hurricanes Irma and Maria devastated Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) this September, a survey revealed that only 54% of Americans know that the 3.4 million Puerto Ricans are American citizens. Many Americans are also unaware that the USVI are part of the United States. Paradoxically, 2017 was not only the year […]

A Little Glimpse at Treaty Research at the Law Library of Congress – International Day of Peace

Yesterday was International Day of Peace and since, historically speaking, peace often meant treaties between various countries, it seemed a good occasion to talk about doing treaty research.  When I began working at the Law Library of Congress over 11 1/2 years ago, I was excited by the variety of questions from patrons.  But there […]

Danish Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law research consultant covering Scandinavian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. This post is part of a series highlighting the Law Library’s foreign law collections. A couple weeks ago, Jenny wrote about Germany’s “Day of the Basic Law,” which is celebrated on the anniversary […]

Elor Azaria and Alexander Blackman: Adjudication of Unlawful Military Shootings

What impact do prolonged periods of stress and fear have on a soldier’s behavior? Do the horrors of war and terrorist acts justify conduct that would otherwise be unlawful? While such circumstances do not seem to amount to justification for violating the law, it is notable that “exceptional stressors” and constant threats faced by soldiers were recently considered […]

Handling of Sexual Offenses in the Israeli Military

On December 18, 2016 the Tel- Aviv Military Court convicted a brigadier general in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) of sexual offenses against female soldiers serving under his command. The conviction is believed to be of the highest ranking IDF soldier of such crimes, based on the officer’s admission as a result of a plea bargain. The officer had initially been […]