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World Tourism Day and Air Passenger Rights

On September 27, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) annually celebrates World Tourism Day. The UNWTO is a UN specialized agency “responsible for the promotion of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism.” One of its goals is to “advocate[e] the value of tourism as a driver of socioeconomic growth and development.” I personally enjoy travelling […]

The Pyramid of Niches in an 18th Century Legal Gazette

Today, February 5th, is the 101st anniversary of the Mexican Constitution of 1917.  As I have covered the history of the Mexican constitution before, I would like to observe this holiday with another Mexican matter. I have been working on a digitization proposal, and–as I was drafting the narrative and compiling the details for it–I chanced upon this […]

Canadian Courts Are Taking a Step Toward Corporate Liability of Multinationals for Wrongdoings Abroad

The following is a guest post by Marie-Philippe Lavoie, an intern who worked with Tariq Ahmad in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress this summer. The globalization of business has allowed multinational corporations to conduct economic activities that transcend national boundaries. These activities have had both a positive and a negative impact […]

Acta de Independencia de Centro América — Pic of the Week

This is a guest post by Hazel Ceron, external relations assistant with the Law Library Office of External Relations. On this day 196 years ago (September 15, 1821), the Acta de Independencia de Centro América proclaimed independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua from Spain. In celebration of the 196th anniversary, today’s […]

Catching Up with the Indigenous Law Portal: Moving South

The following is a guest post by Carla Davis-Castro, a librarian who has been working on our Indigenous Law Portal. The Indigenous Law Portal, launched on the Law Library’s website in June 2014, provides an open access platform to legal materials regarding how indigenous peoples govern themselves. Currently featuring North America (Canada, the United States, and Mexico), […]

On the Shelf: Hispanic Heritage Month and Recent Latin American Law Material Acquisitions

Earlier this year we reflected on Hispanic Heritage Month with a post by my colleague Francisco Macias. He and I have explored the origins of the month in previous years’ posts. You can read this year’s Presidential Proclamation online too. Once you know all about it, how will you commemorate this month? It begins each […]

On the Shelf: Hispanic Heritage Month at the Law Library

The following post is a joint effort by Betty Lupinacci (intro, photos) and Jennifer Davis (main text), both staff members in the Collection Services Division. Earlier this month Jennifer wrote about some of our newest acquisitions on piracy law.  Following that post, the Global Legal Collection Directorate decided that we would regularly highlight not only new […]

Litigating Memory: The Legal Case Behind the Moiwana and Sand Creek Massacres

The following is a guest post by Collection Services Division’s intern Timothy Byram.  Timothy’s interest in Latin American culture led him to one of the Library’s many public programs, piquing his interest in two particular cases which he discusses here. Litigation is defined as a contest in a courtroom realized “for the purpose of enforcing […]

Archived Legal Materials from Official Gazettes Now Available Through Law.gov

The following is a guest post by Janice Hyde, director of the Global Legal Collection Directorate at the Law Library of Congress. The Law Library of Congress has always relied on primary sources of law wherever possible to respond to requests from the U.S. Congress and its other patrons. For foreign countries, the fundamental source […]