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Newly Published Report on the Development of Laws on Abortion, Genetic Consultation, and Assisted Reproduction in Eleven Countries

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress covering the United Kingdom and several other jurisdictions. Clare has written numerous posts for In Custodia Legis, including Revealing the Presence of Ghosts; Weird Laws, or Urban Legends?; FALQs: Brexit Referendum; and  100 Years of “Poppy Day” in the United Kingdom.  The Law […]

Law Library of Congress Studies on Firearms, Weapons, and Gun Control

A search of legal reports produced by the Law Library of Congress has identified multiple reports on gun laws around the world. The reports date back to the early 1960s, reflecting the interest in the topics of “firearms” OR “weapons” OR “gun control” OR “weapons industry” by Law Library of Congress patrons over the years. […]

National Library Week – These Are a Few of Our Favorite Things

We celebrate many commemorative days, weeks, and holidays at the Law Library of Congress, from Public Service Recognition Week to Constitution Day. One week that is particularly dear to our hearts is National Library Week. Each April, libraries across America celebrate the important work of libraries and librarians, and the countless ways in which they […]

100 Year Anniversary of the Austrian Constitution

Unlike most countries, Austria does not have just one constitutional document, like the Constitution of the United States for example, but several documents that have constitutional status. Of these documents, the most important one is the Austrian Federal Constitutional Law (Bundes-Verfassungsgesetz). It was adopted by the Constituent National Assembly on October 1, 1920—100 years ago today—and entered into force […]

Einstein’s Fateful Letter

Between July 18 and August 15, 1939, one of the most consequential letters in modern history was drafted by Albert Einstein and the Hungarian-born physicist Leo Szilard. The letter, which was eventually delivered to President Franklin Roosevelt,led to the Manhattan Project and the development of the first two atomic weapons. Szilard and two other Hungarian-born physicists, […]

Two Koreas Separated by Demilitarized Zone

This following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist who covers Japan and various other countries in East and Southeast Asia. She has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws and regulations passed in the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake, and […]

The Declaration of Independence in Foreign Languages

In preparation for the upcoming Independence Day celebration tomorrow, we thought it might be interesting to show that there is also an international dimension to this national holiday. The Declaration of Independence is regarded as one of the milestone documents that shaped America, but it also had a major influence abroad. After the Continental Congress approved the […]