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Magna Carta in the US, Part I: The British Pavilion of the 1939 New York World’s Fair

From November 6 through January 19, 2015, the Lincoln Cathedral Magna Carta, one of four remaining originals from 1215 will be on display along with other rare materials from the Library’s rich collections to tell the story of 800 years of its influence on the history of political liberty.  This is the first installment in a series […]

Hispanic Heritage Month On the Shelf: What’s New

Last week, Geraldine talked about the events the Library is hosting to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Hispanic Heritage Month commemorates Mexico’s independence day (September 16: ¡Viva Hidalgo!), and the anniversaries of independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. With these celebrations in mind, we’ve compiled a list of some of the new materials […]

New Report on Laws of Foreign Governments Lifting Sovereign Immunity

The following is a guest post by Luis Acosta, chief of one of the Law Library’s foreign, comparative, and international law divisions.  Luis also recently wrote a post about a report on education as a constitutional right in foreign countries. The doctrine of sovereign immunity, or state immunity, is an international law principle that limits […]

WWI Conscription and Conscientious Objectors in New Zealand

The following is a tale of World War I legal history with a literary twist.  (Working at the world’s largest library, with books on every subject, I could hardly leave the literary aspect out, could I?) I have previously written about New Zealand’s involvement in World War I, particularly in the Gallipoli campaign, and related […]

Arbitration in Turkey and Istanbul as a New International Arbitration Center

The following is a guest post by Ozlem Aydin Sakrak. Ozlem is an attorney with the Office of the Legal Advisor of the Turkish Treasury. She recently completed her internship in the Law Library’s Global Legal Research Center and is about to return to Ankara. We extend our best wishes to her for a continued successful career in her home country.  […]

Orin S. Kerr Named New Law Library Scholar-in-Residence

The following is a guest post by Cynthia Jordan, Senior Writer-Editor at the Law Library of Congress. As the program manager for the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation Program on Demography, Technology, and Criminal Justice at the Library of Congress, I am pleased to welcome Orin S. Kerr as the Scholar-in-Residence for the program.  As Scholar-in-Residence, […]

An Interview with Peter Quinn, Writer-Editor

Today’s interview is with Peter Quinn, a Writer-Editor in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. Describe your background. I was born in New York City but spent most of my childhood on the south shore of Long Island in the village of Bellport. It’s a waterfront community that survives on revenue from […]