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An Interview with Angela Kinney, Chief of the African, Latin American & Western European Division of Library Services

Today’s interview is with Angela Kinney. Angela is the Chief of the African, Latin American & Western European Division in the Acquisitions & Bibliographic Access Directorate of Library Services. Describe your background I was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and raised in a large, happy family that included my parents and eight brothers and sisters. My […]

American Association of Law Libraries 2019 Conference Recap

The following is a guest post by Elizabeth Osborne, Legal Reference Librarian at the Law Library of Congress.  A number of Law Library of Congress staff members recently attended the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) 112th Annual Meeting and Conference in Washington, DC. The conference provides law librarians and legal information professionals with opportunities for […]

Daylight Saving Time No More?

On Sunday March 10, 2019, most states in the United States “sprang forward,” meaning the clocks were set one hour forward. Most of us have by now more or less adjusted to the time change. The reason that we adjust our clocks twice a year (“springing forward” and “falling back”) in the United States can […]

Judicial Combat – Barbarous Relic or Timeless Litigation Strategy?

This post is coauthored by Nathan Dorn, rare book curator, and Robert Brammer, senior legal information specialist. You are sure to hear “Objection!” shouted in the context of any legal drama. But what are they objecting to, and more importantly, on what basis? In modern jurisprudence, the rules of evidence are paramount to trying a case. Deciding whether evidence is […]

The Creation of the Department of Justice

It is a curiosity of history that while the office of the Attorney General of the United States was created by the first congress as a part of the Judiciary Act of 1789, the Department of Justice was not authorized until over eighty years later, in 1870. Section 35 of the Judiciary Act provided And […]

An Interview with Elizabeth Pugh, General Counsel

In celebration of Women’s History Month, this week’s interview is with Elizabeth Pugh, general counsel of the Library of Congress. Ms. Pugh has had an illustrious legal career in the federal government that spans over thirty years. Prior to joining the Library, she served at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Department of Education, […]

Associate Justice Antonin Scalia

The following is a guest post by James Martin, senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress.  James has previously written on The District of Columbia 1862 Emancipation Law and The Articles of Confederation: The First Constitution of the United States. Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Antonin Scalia died in Texas […]