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Open For Business: National Entrepreneur’s Day On the Shelf

National Entrepreneur’s Day is a commemorative day to encourage innovative business people creating new jobs and economic growth in the United States. Today’s holiday was created by presidential proclamation and first celebrated in November 2010; an enthusiastic startup lobbied for the day.  As the commemoration falls right before Small Business Saturday, the timing could not […]

Lessons Learned from the AALL 2016 Annual Conference in Chicago

We are back from the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) 2016 Annual Conference in Chicago. I was happy to present with Abbie Grotke at the Legal Information Preservation Alliance’s annual meeting.  I discussed several Law Library related web archiving initiatives, including: adding the historic Congressional Record from THOMAS to Congress.gov; the recent Archives Unleashed event; using Perma.cc in our research […]

Pic of the Week: Monday is not Presidents’ Day – Or is it?

This coming Monday, February 15, we will celebrate the federal holiday, Washington’s Birthday. You may be thinking, “my calendar says Monday is ‘Presidents’ Day,’ not ‘Washington’s birthday!’” Interestingly, the federal holiday is officially called Washington’s Birthday (5 US Code 6103) and is observed on the third Monday in February as established by Public Law 90-361 […]

An Interview with Sheila Hollis, New Chair of the ABA Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress

This week’s interview is with Sheila Hollis, new chair of the ABA Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress. Ms. Hollis is also chair of the Washington, D.C. office of Duane Morris LLP, where she specializes in domestic and international energy and environmental matters. Please describe your background. Westerner, great affection for Colorado, Northern […]

Centennial of the 1913 Suffrage March

As a graduate of Oberlin College, I have always been proud that when Oberlin was established in 1833, it was the first co-educational college in the country, admitting both men and women.  However, it did not initially admit men and women on the same terms: women were not admitted to the baccalaureate program until 1837.   […]