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An Interview with Colin Hess, GIS Intern at the Law Library of Congress

This is an interview with Colin Hess, currently an intern at the Law Library of Congress Information Technology Office providing Geographic Information System support. Describe your background I am from Chesterfield, Virginia and am a senior at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia (UMW).  I am a Geography major, with a concentration on […]

Referendum on New Zealand’s Voting System

Today (currently Saturday, November 26 in New Zealand) is election day in New Zealand.  In addition to voting for a candidate standing in their district (“electorate“) and for the political party that they want in Parliament, voters will be participating in a referendum on whether the electoral system should be changed. The current electoral system […]

We’re Here to Serve

The following is a guest post by Megan Lulofs, who works as a contractor from CGI in our Collection Services Division, and as an independent consultant in our Public Services Division of the Law Library of Congress. Just last week I started answering questions from our Ask A Librarian service–and I love it. I’ve been looking forward […]

Finding U.S. Supreme Court Records and Briefs

My 11th grade English teacher* sent me a Facebook message a couple of weeks ago asking for assistance in locating the records and briefs from Brown v. Board of Education.  I replied with a list of resources, including exhibits at the Library of Congress and the National Archives.  In answering his question, I realized that […]

Shanghaied!

As you can see from my previous post on researching Al Capone’s jury, some of the questions that come through “Ask A Librarian” can be quite fascinating. Some on their face appear simple, but upon further research, reveal hidden depths. A recent question involved a private law from the 71st Congress (1929-1931).*  Private laws affect […]

Tales of Al Capone’s Jury

A few weeks ago my mother asked me to research a bit of family lore. Like a good daughter sometimes does, I forgot. But then! Then I saw the exact same question in our “Ask A Librarian” service! (For background, patrons may send a question through the Library of Congress “Ask A Librarian” service. These […]