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From the Serial Set: “Memorials” and an International Copyright Law?

The following is a guest post by Bailey DeSimone, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. “Memorials,” or requests “that the Congress take some action, or refrain from taking certain action,” are housed throughout the United States Congressional Serial Set. These documents provide insight into the communication between citizens – […]

New Shelving Evokes Old Memories

We are now two-thirds through having the Law Library’s shelving replaced in the second of four quadrants in our closed stacks. The new shelving is lighter, easier to move and conforms to current safety standards for spacing between shelves. And it’s making shelving and retrieval much easier for staff and contractors. As I walked through […]

Historical Law Library Reports to be Published Online

The Law Library of Congress has digitized and published its first batch of historical legal reports as part of a multi-year effort to archive and share thousands of these reports with researchers and other members of the public. These first 250 digitized reports are now available through the Publications of the Law Library of Congress […]

MERCOSUR: Global Legal Collections Highlights

The following is a guest post by Graciela Rodriguez-Ferrand, a foreign law specialist who covers Spain, Argentina, and other countries in South America. As a foreign law specialist for the Law Library of Congress covering most of South America, I thought a blog post on legal resources concerning the Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR) (Southern Common […]

From the Serial Set: “Peculiarities” of Life in D.C. (1880)

The following is a guest post by Bailey DeSimone, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. Washington, D.C. became the capital of the United States of America in 1790. On February 27, 1801, the District of Columbia Organic Act established the city as an unincorporated territory. Throughout the 219 years […]

Robert H. Terrell, Municipal Judge

Robert H. Terrell (1857-1925), the first African American judge in the Washington, D.C. Municipal Court, was also an educator, a writer and a law professor; and husband to activist, suffragist and educator Mary Church Terrell. Terrell was born in rural Orange, Virginia and attended grammar school in D.C., Groton Academy in Massachusetts before graduating cum […]

Únete para mejorar el acceso a documentos jurídicos de España con la campaña Herencia

[Haz clic aquí para la versión en inglés/Click here for the English version of this post.] Nos complace presentarles Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents, el primer proyecto de crowdsourcing dedicado a documentos en otros idiomas aparte del inglés.  La Biblioteca Jurídica del Congreso te invita a ayudarnos a mejorar el acceso a nuestra colección […]

Join the Library’s Herencia Campaign to Improve Access to Spanish Legal Documents

[Click here for the Spanish version of this post/Haz clic aquí para la versión en español.] We are excited to launch, in late February, the Library’s first crowdsourcing project dedicated to papers in languages other than English, Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents. The Law Library of Congress invites you to help improve access to […]

From the Serial Set: Before It Was Presidents’ Day…

The following is a guest post by Bailey DeSimone, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. Correspondence between the Congress and the American public is essential in understanding legislative decision-making. Among the documents and journals of the Serial Set, we’ve discovered reprints of letters between Congress and the Washington family […]