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How Do I Find…?

As you may have noticed in my previous posts, I’m making an effort to highlight useful tools contained on the Law Library’s website that our readers may not be aware of.  A section of the website that I use frequently is called “How Do I Find…?“ The guides are especially helpful in the beginning of […]

Official Gazettes: Afghanistan to Zimbabwe

While the United States does not publish an official gazette, most countries of the world do.  These primary law sources are invaluable for foreign legal research.  While no two countries’ gazettes are identical, most contain legislation, orders, regulations, statutory instruments, and international agreements.  Some even include decisions of courts and administrative agencies.  The currency of […]

A Look Inside the Vault

Some of the real gems of the Law Library’s collection require special handling and cannot be shelved in the open stacks.  For these materials, we have the Rare Book Collection.  The Law Library’s collection of rare books consists of approximately 60,000 volumes of books and bound manuscripts. The collection is a great place for researchers […]

The Romance of Language

The following is a guest post by Taru Spiegel, Reference Specialist in the European Division. A lawyer I know who does legal drafting says that there is no need to use archaic terms such as “aforethought,” “forthwith,” “wherefore,” or “to wit.”  Legal language should be clear, concise, and unambiguous.  Everybody should be able to understand […]

Happy Thanksgiving!

Although I’m from New Zealand, my mother is American and my family gets together with other American Kiwis to celebrate Thanksgiving each year.  However, as there is no public holiday for this day, we tend to need to improvise with dates, with Thanksgiving dinner generally occurring on a weekend some time between October and January.  […]

Welcome to a Sea of Blawgs

The following is a guest post by Matt Braun, Legal Reference Librarian in our Public Services Directorate. Over the last five years, legal blogs (or “blawgs” = law + blogs) have increasingly become vehicles for legal scholars, practitioners, and observers from across the globe to share information on developments in various areas of law, as […]

Finding U.S. Supreme Court Records and Briefs

My 11th grade English teacher* sent me a Facebook message a couple of weeks ago asking for assistance in locating the records and briefs from Brown v. Board of Education.  I replied with a list of resources, including exhibits at the Library of Congress and the National Archives.  In answering his question, I realized that […]