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Join Us on March 25 for a Foreign and Comparative Law Webinar on “Removal of Head of State Based on Incapacity or Criminal Activities: Case Study Israel”

On March 23, 2021, Israel will go through its fourth election in two years. Prime Minister (PM) Binyamin Netanyahu heads the current transitional government, following the collapse of the outgoing rotating government, in which he served as a PM, with Benny Gantz as an alternate PM.

The formation of the outgoing rotating government was enabled by the adoption of extensive changes to the government system contained in Basic Law: the Government (Amendment No. 8 and Temporary Provision). The Amendment Law defines a rotating government as “a government that during its tenure will be headed alternately by a member of the Knesset that formed it, as well as by an additional Knesset member.” Among other matters, it regulates the transfer of power between the PM and the alternate PM, and addresses removal procedures of either one based on incapacity or a conviction in a criminal trial.

PM Netanyahu’s criminal trial officially started on February 24, 2021, with the evidence phase delayed until April 5, 2021, following the upcoming election on March 23, 2021. The PM has rejected the accusations against him, alleging that the charges were fabricated and politically motivated.

As part of the Law Library of Congress Legal Research Institute’s Foreign and Comparative Law Webinar Series, we will be presenting, on March 25, 2021, a webinar titled Removal of Head of State Based on Incapacity or Criminal Activities: Case Study Israel. The webinar will include an examination of the grounds and procedures for removal of heads of state based on incapacity or criminal activities in a number of countries. It will then address the current rules under Israeli law for the temporary or permanent removal of a PM. The webinar will examine possible ways of limiting potential conflicts of interest that may result from adjudicating a case involving a sitting PM, including proposals to delay criminal proceedings until he leaves office.

Flyer announcing upcoming foreign law webinar created by Susan Taylor-Pikulsky.

The webinar will be presented by senior foreign law specialist Ruth Levush. Ruth holds a Master of Comparative Law (American Practice) from The George Washington University Law School and a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B) from Tel Aviv University Law School. Ruth practiced law in Israel and is a member of the District of Columbia Bar.

Please register here

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