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Villa Horion, Düsseldorf, Germany – Pic of the Week

In December 2018, I visited Düsseldorf, Germany, the capital of the German state North Rhine-Westphalia. While strolling along the river Rhine, I passed by “Villa Horion.” Villa Horion was built in 1910/11 by the German architect Hermann vom Endt in the neoclassical style. In 1984, it was registered as a historically protected building by the Department for the Preservation of Historical Buildings in Düsseldorf (Denkmalbehörde Düsseldorf).

Villa Horion, Düsseldorf, Germany. Photo by Jenny Gesley.

The building was originally used as the official residence of the state governor (Landeshauptmann) of the Rhine Province, a former province of Prussia. It is named in honor of the last democratically elected state governor Johannes Horion, who served from 1922 until 1933. After WWII, the British military used it as an officers’ mess until 1956. In 1958, the state cabinet announced that Villa Horion would be used as the office of the Prime Minister and State Chancellery of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. A statue of Johannes Rau, former Prime Minister of North Rhine-Westphalia (1978 to 1998) and German Federal President (1999 to 2004), stands on the square in front of the building. In 1999, the office was relocated to a different part of Düsseldorf. Today, the building houses the petitions department of the parliamentary administration as well as the “House of Parliamentary History” (Haus der Parlamentsgeschichte), where visitors can learn about the history of the state parliament and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia in general.

Johannes Rau, former Prime Minister of North Rhine-Westphalia and German Federal President. Photo by Jenny Gesley.

Karl Arnold. Photo by Jenny Gesley.

On the other side of the square, you can find a statue of Karl Arnold, former major of Düsseldorf (1947-1956), first democratically elected Prime Minster of North Rhine-Westphalia (1947-1956), and first President of the German Bundesrat (1949-1950), the constitutional body through which the states participate in the legislative process. In his hands, he holds a paper with several of his political maxims. One of them reads:

 

Der Weg zur Freiheit und Wohlfahrt ist keine Autobahn, sondern ein schmaler und mit viel Geduld beladener Pfad. Diesen Pfad freizulegen und ihn zu einer breiten Vorstraße zu erweitern, ist das Ziel einer sinnvollen Politik.

Translation (by author):

The way towards freedom and prosperity is not a highway, but a narrow path paved with patience. To uncover this path and to broaden it into a bigger road is the goal of a sensible policy.

Holy Cow – Making Sense of Japanese Wagyu Cow Export Rules

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist who covers Japan and other countries in East and Southeast Asia. Sayuri has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including Japanese Criminal Legal System as Seen Through the Carlos Ghosn Case, Disciplining Judges for “Bad Tweets”, Engagement under Japanese Law and Imperial House Rules, Is the Sound of Children Actually Noise?, How […]

Raoul Wallenberg – Swedish-American Collaboration in Protection of Hungarian Jews

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law expert at the Law Library of Congress. Elin has frequently authored posts for In Custodia Legis on diverse legal topics, including On the Shelf – Finnish Forest and Forestry Laws, Swedish Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights, FALQs: The Swedish Budget Process, 60 Years of Lego Building Blocks and […]

The Library of the French National Assembly – Pic of the Week

The following is a guest post from Nicolas Boring, foreign law specialist covering French speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. During my most recent trip to France, I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to visit the National Assembly, one of the two houses of the French Parliament. The National Assembly is located […]

Japanese Criminal Legal System as Seen Through the Carlos Ghosn Case

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a senior foreign law specialist who covers Japan and various other countries in East and Southeast Asia. Sayuri has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including Disciplining Judges for “Bad Tweets”, Engagement under Japanese Law and Imperial House Rules, Is the Sound of Children Actually Noise?, How to Boost your Medal Count in […]

Happy National Spaghetti Day!

Today, January 4, is National Spaghetti Day. And no one appreciates pasta more than the self-proclaimed “Pastafarians,” members of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM). According to their website, they believe, among others things, that “[p]irates were the original Pastafarians”, that “the Flying Spaghetti Monster created the world much as it exists today, but for […]

On Gene Edited Babies: What Chinese Law Says

A Chinese scientist recently claimed to have edited the DNA of human embryos and created the world’s first genetically edited babies, although his claim has not been verified so far. Chinese authorities reportedly said the incident as reported by the media “blatantly violated China’s relevant laws and regulations,” and ordered an investigation into the scientist’s claim. […]

On the Shelf – Finnish Forest and Forestry Laws

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law expert at the Law Library of Congress. Elin has written posts for In Custodia Legis on an extensive array of legal topics, including Swedish Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights, FALQs: The Swedish Budget Process, 60 Years of Lego Building Blocks and Danish Patent Law, Finland: 100 Years of Independence – […]