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Wicked Strumpets, Cannibals and Witches in English Case Law

The genesis of this post lies in research that led me to the Law Library stacks and into one of my favorite locations:  the section containing English trials.  Long before the arrival of soap operas and reality television programs, people (well, us Brits, anyway) used to be titillated by sordid criminal trials.   I suppose to […]

An Interview with Hanibal Goitom, Foreign Law Specialist

This week’s interview is with Hanibal Goitom, a Foreign Law Specialist in our Global Legal Research Center.  Hanibal has previously written two guest posts for In Custodia Legis.  His “Power Lunch” was also discussed in the post There’s No Place Like Home. Describe your background. I am a Foreign Law Specialist at the Law Library […]

Egypt’s Constitutional Referendum

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, Senior Legal Information Analyst. Last month I wrote about the constitutional dilemma in Egypt and some of the possibilities for moving forward.  Since then a number of important events have happened, which eventually led to Egyptians voting in favor of constitutional amendments to the 1971 Constitution […]

Trains and Corruption in China

The corruption of government officials in China, as in a number of other countries, is a major concern and attempts to investigate and prosecute instances of corruption can generate a lot of public attention – particularly if a senior official or significant project is the subject of the investigation.  This has been the case with […]

Ireland’s Election

The following is a guest post by Steve Clarke, Senior Foreign Law Specialist at the Law Library of Congress. Ireland employs a very complicated single transferable voting system to elect the 166 members of Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas.  Under this system, in which voters rank their choices, between three and five […]