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Ireland’s Election

The following is a guest post by Steve Clarke, Senior Foreign Law Specialist at the Law Library of Congress. Ireland employs a very complicated single transferable voting system to elect the 166 members of Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas.  Under this system, in which voters rank their choices, between three and five […]

The History of the Mexican Constitution

As a Mexican-born American, I’m always looking for occasions to celebrate.  I guess this festive nature is simply dyed-in-the-wool (or dyed-in-the-cotton, if you’re Southern-raised, as I am).  With that in mind, I wanted to write a bit about the Mexican Constitution – especially since two related holidays take place in the month of February:  Mexican […]

What’s Hot this Year in the Global Legal Monitor

As we’ve mentioned previously, the Law Library has a great news service called the Global Legal Monitor.  Often these stories about legal developments in many different jurisdictions are ones that don’t feature in U.S. newspapers or news programs, and they link or refer to a wide range of different sources of information.  On the homepage […]

The Legal Ramifications of the Current Political Crisis in Egypt

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, Senior Legal Information Analyst at the Law Library of Congress. On January 25, all across Egypt, hundreds of thousands of Egyptians took to the streets to demand the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak.  Mubarak responded to these demands by firing his cabinet and appointing a new […]

The Treaty of Wanghia – Pic of the Week

This week (February 3) saw the start of Chinese New Year celebrations.  To mark the occasion, we thought we’d highlight an interesting China-related item in our collections.  Our great staff that work with our closed stacks located the Treaty of Peace, Amity, and Commerce, Between the United States of America and the Chinese Empire (commonly […]