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Research Guides in Focus – How to Trace Federal Regulations: A Beginner’s Guide

The following is a guest post by Anna Price, a legal reference librarian at the Law Library of Congress.

Introduction page of How to Trace Federal Regulations: A Beginner's Guide Research Guide

Introduction page of How to Trace Federal Regulations: A Beginner’s Guide Research Guide, //guides.loc.gov/trace-federal-regulations

For this latest installment of Research Guides in Focus, we are presenting an overview of one of the Law Library’s newest additions to our Research Guide collection – How to Trace Federal Regulations: A Beginner’s Guide. The guide begins by introducing readers to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). It gives an overview of its publication schedule and directs researchers to where they may find the CFR online, including the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (eCFR) and govinfo.

The guide then offers a brief tutorial on authority notes and source notes. Researchers at the Law Library of Congress frequently wish to read the text of a rule or regulation that was in effect on a certain date. I have found that when they learn how to interpret source notes, they gain an understanding of how rules and regulations differ from legislation and feel empowered to dig into the text on their own. The guide’s background on these features is useful not only for beginners, but also more experienced researchers who want a brief refresher on administrative law.

Finally, the guide instructs readers on how to find rulemaking docket information. It discusses the difference between a regulation identifier number (RIN) and a docket number, how to find these numbers, and how to use them to navigate rulemaking materials with websites like Regulations.gov.

We hope you will find this guide helpful in your research. As always, if you have any questions, please contact us through Ask A Librarian.

Marking the 474th Anniversary of the Commencement of the Ecumenical Council of Trent

The following is a guest post by Dante Figueroa, Senior Legal Information Analyst at the Law Library of Congress. Recently, I was reviewing a full cart of canon law books and found interesting materials related to the Catholic Church’s ecumenical councils. Ecumenical councils are “legally convened assemblies of ecclesiastical dignitaries and theological experts for the […]

Report on Right of Huguenots to French Citizenship

The following is a guest post from Nicolas Boring, the foreign law specialist covering French- speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Nicolas has previously blogged about The Library of the French National Assembly – Pic of the Week, among others. A recent Law Library of Congress report examines a little-known historical development: the right […]

The Constitution Annotated—Impeachment Clauses

This guest post is by the Law Library’s Chief of the Public Services Division, Andrew Winston. Andrew has written several posts for the blog, including Federal Courts Web Archive Launched, A Visit to the Peace Palace Library, and The Revised Statutes of the United States: Predecessor to the U.S. Code. The Library of Congress has updated […]

Technology & the Law of Corporate Responsibility – The Impact of Blockchain

The following is a guest post by Elizabeth Boomer, a legal research analyst in the Global Legal Research Directorate. Blockchain, a technology regularly associated with digital currency, is increasingly being utilized as a corporate social responsibility tool in major international corporations. This intersection of law, technology, and corporate responsibility was addressed earlier this month at the World Bank Law, Justice, […]

In Japan: Pardon System Debated

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist who covers Japan and other countries in East and Southeast Asia. Sayuri has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including New Era, New Law Number, Holy Cow – Making Sense of Japanese Wagyu Cow Export Rules, Japanese Criminal Legal System as Seen Through the Carlos Ghosn Case, Disciplining Judges for […]

FALQs: Article 370 and the Removal of Jammu and Kashmir’s Special Status

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a foreign law specialist in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. Tariq has previously contributed posts on Islamic Law in Pakistan – Global Legal Collection Highlights, India’s Regulatory Approach to Uber, and FALQ posts on Beef Bans in India and Proposals to Reform Pakistan’s Blasphemy […]

Special Exhibition at Library of Congress To Mark 150th Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi’s Birth

The following is a guest post by Tariq Ahmad, a foreign law specialist in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. Tariq has previously contributed posts on The Constitution of India – Pic of the Week,  Islamic Law in Pakistan – Global Legal Collection Highlights, India’s Regulatory Approach to Uber, Sedition Law in India, […]

Federal Courts, Judge Gerhard Gesell, and the Security State

This following is a guest post by Ryan Reft, a historian of the modern United States focusing on domestic policy and law in the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress. Ryan previously contributed two other posts to In Custodia Legis - Simon Sobeloff and Jewish Baltimore and Rights and Resistance: Civil Liberties during World War […]