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Celebrate the 230th Anniversary of the Bill of Rights with the Constitution Annotated

This is a guest post by Jeanne Dennis, senior counsel for legal programs and initiatives in the American Law Division of the Congressional Research Service. Yesterday, December 15, was Bill of Rights Day. Celebrate the 230th anniversary of the Bill of Rights this week by exploring the online Constitution Annotated. Launched in September 2019, the online Constitution […]

From Summorum Pontificum to Traditionis Custodes: Changes in Liturgical Matters at the Catholic Church

The following post is by Dante Figueroa, a senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress. He has recently written for In Custodia Legis on the Italian Parliamentary Library; Spanish Legal Documents (15th to 19th Century); Recent Legislation Enacted by Italy to Tackle COVID-19; and Italy: A New Silk Road Between Italy and China – the Belt and Road Initiative. […]

New Report on Children and Data Protection Laws in Ireland

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress covering the United Kingdom and several other jurisdictions. Clare has written numerous posts for In Custodia Legis, including 100 Years of “Poppy Day” in the United Kingdom; Weird Laws, or Urban Legends?; FALQs: Brexit Referendum; and The UK’s Legal Response to the London […]

Cambodia’s Legal Professions

The following is a guest post by Pichrotanak Bunthan, a legal research fellow with the Law Library of Congress who is working under the supervision of Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and other jurisdictions in East and Southeast Asia. In my previous blog post, I described what legal education in Cambodia looks like. As a sequel to that post, the […]

100 Years of “Poppy Day” in the United Kingdom

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress covering the United Kingdom and several other jurisdictions. Clare has written numerous posts for In Custodia Legis, including Weird Laws, or Urban Legends?; FALQs: Brexit Referendum; and The UK’s Legal Response to the London Bombings of 7/7. “At the eleventh […]

The Congressional Cemetery: Celebrating Native American Heritage Month

This is a guest post by Ann Hemmens, a senior legal reference librarian with the Law Library of Congress. Ann has contributed a number of posts to this blog, including posts on Congressional Cemetery – The Boggs Family, Free Public Access to Federal Materials on Guide to Law Online, U.S. Supreme Court: Original Jurisdiction and Oral Arguments, and Domestic […]

The Police and the Paranormal in England

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress covering the United Kingdom and several other jurisdictions. Clare has written numerous posts for In Custodia Legis, including Revealing the Presences of Ghosts; Weird Laws, or Urban Legends?; FALQs: Brexit Referendum; and The UK’s Legal Response to the London Bombings […]

Herencia: 18th Century Marriage Orders and their Consequences

The following is a guest post by Naomi Welikala, who served as a summer 2021 remote intern transcribing and researching documents in the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign at the Law Library of Congress. Throughout my time as one of the Herencia crowdsourcing interns, I have come across a wide variety of themes in […]

Cambodia’s Legal Education

The following is a guest post by Pichrotanak Bunthan, a legal research fellow with the Law Library of Congress, who is working under the supervision of Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and other jurisdictions in East and Southeast Asia. History and Background of Higher Education in Cambodia Cambodia’s education system, including legal education, had […]

Congressional Cemetery – The Boggs Family

This is a guest post by Ann Hemmens, a senior legal reference librarian with the Law Library of Congress. Ann has contributed a number of posts to this blog, including posts on Free Public Access to Federal Materials on Guide to Law Online, U.S. Supreme Court: Original Jurisdiction and Oral Arguments, and Domestic Violence: Resources in the United States.  Three members […]