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State Collections Being Relocated and Where to Find Them

The following is a guest post by Margaret Wood, Legal Reference Specialist in our Public Services Directorate. Here in the Law Library Reading Room we are continuing our work to relocate certain collections in preparation for the Reading Room Remodeling.  The purpose of this post is to give everyone an update about the collections currently […]

Egypt’s Constitutional Referendum

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, Senior Legal Information Analyst. Last month I wrote about the constitutional dilemma in Egypt and some of the possibilities for moving forward.  Since then a number of important events have happened, which eventually led to Egyptians voting in favor of constitutional amendments to the 1971 Constitution […]

Trains and Corruption in China

The corruption of government officials in China, as in a number of other countries, is a major concern and attempts to investigate and prosecute instances of corruption can generate a lot of public attention – particularly if a senior official or significant project is the subject of the investigation.  This has been the case with […]

Classes Offered by the Law Library of Congress

The following is a guest post by Shameema Rahman, Legal Reference Specialist in our Public Services Division. Do you know the Law Library offers two classes to the public: Orientation to Legal Research and THOMAS Orientation? Orientation to Legal Research and the Use of Law Library Collections is a basic introduction to legal sources and […]

Ireland’s Election

The following is a guest post by Steve Clarke, Senior Foreign Law Specialist at the Law Library of Congress. Ireland employs a very complicated single transferable voting system to elect the 166 members of Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas.  Under this system, in which voters rank their choices, between three and five […]

The History of the Mexican Constitution

As a Mexican-born American, I’m always looking for occasions to celebrate.  I guess this festive nature is simply dyed-in-the-wool (or dyed-in-the-cotton, if you’re Southern-raised, as I am).  With that in mind, I wanted to write a bit about the Mexican Constitution – especially since two related holidays take place in the month of February:  Mexican […]

The Legal Ramifications of the Current Political Crisis in Egypt

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, Senior Legal Information Analyst at the Law Library of Congress. On January 25, all across Egypt, hundreds of thousands of Egyptians took to the streets to demand the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak.  Mubarak responded to these demands by firing his cabinet and appointing a new […]