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Standardization and the Law

On December 22, 1917—100 years ago today—the German Institute for Standardization (Deutsches Institut für Normung, DIN) was founded. DIN develops the content of standards and coordinates the work of other bodies involved in the process. It is organized as a private non-profit organization and has entered into an agreement with the German government to be recognized […]

Disappearance of a Prime Minister

On this day fifty years ago, December 19, 1967, it was announced that the then-Prime Minister of Australia, Harold Holt, was officially presumed dead. Mr. Holt, who had been Prime Minister for 22 months, from January 1966, had disappeared two days earlier while swimming in the ocean at Cheviot Beach near Portsea, in the state of […]

Two Koreas Separated by Demilitarized Zone

This following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist who covers Japan and various other countries in East and Southeast Asia. She has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws and regulations passed in the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake, and […]

The Creation of the Department of Justice

It is a curiosity of history that while the office of the Attorney General of the United States was created by the first congress as a part of the Judiciary Act of 1789, the Department of Justice was not authorized until over eighty years later, in 1870. Section 35 of the Judiciary Act provided And […]

Researching New Zealand’s Laws Related to “Doing Business”

On October 31, 2017, the World Bank released the fifteenth edition of its Doing Business report, subtitled “Reforming to Create Jobs.” As with the fourteenth edition, New Zealand was given the highest “ease of doing business” ranking among 190 countries. The report explains that “[t]he overall measure of the ease of doing business gives an […]

Join the Law Library at the 17th Annual National Book Festival!

The Library of Congress 17th annual National Book Festival kicks off at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, September 2 in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Law Library of Congress staff are delighted once again to have an opportunity to discuss our legal collection and services, and share a number of family-friendly activities with festival attendees. […]

UK Supreme Court rules “Deport first, appeal later” power is unlawful

The following is a guest post by Conleth Burns, a foreign law intern working this summer in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress. Recently, in the R (Kiarie) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2017] UKSC 17 case, the United Kingdom (U.K) Supreme Court issued a decision concerning the ability […]

The Law and Punctuation

This is a guest post by Janeen Williams, legal reference librarian at the Law Library of Congress. Grammar enthusiasts have long debated the utility of the Oxford comma. In the past, authors have been advised that usage of Oxford commas (also known as serial commas) is an issue of style and will be determined by […]