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The Law and Punctuation

This is a guest post by Janeen Williams, legal reference librarian at the Law Library of Congress. Grammar enthusiasts have long debated the utility of the Oxford comma. In the past, authors have been advised that usage of Oxford commas (also known as serial commas) is an issue of style and will be determined by […]

Anniversary of the German Basic Law

Every year on May 23, Germany celebrates the “Day of the Basic Law.” The Basic Law, Germany’s constitution, lays down fundamental rights, establishes the structure and administration of the Federal Republic of Germany, and sets out the legal framework of the three branches of government. Furthermore, it establishes the Federal Republic of Germany as a democratic, federal, […]

The Tale of a Presidential Term in France

This is a guest post by Nicolas Boring who has previously written for In Custodia Legis on a variety of topics including The Protection of Champagne Wine, FALQs: Freedom of Speech in France, How Sunday Came to be a Day of Rest in France, Napoleon Bonaparte and Mining Rights in France, French Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights, and co-collaborated […]

Jewish American Heritage Month

Jewish American Heritage Month is a month to celebrate the contributions Jewish Americans have made to America since the arrival of the first Jewish immigrants in New Amsterdam in 1654. Every year since 1980, Congress and the President have acted together to declare an official observance to recognize the contributions of Jewish Americans to American […]

Changes to the Law on Sexual Offenses in Japan

This following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist who covers Japan and various other countries in East and Southeast Asia. She has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including testing of older drivers in Japan, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws and regulations passed […]

60-Year Anniversary of the Rome Treaties

On March 25, 1957 – 60 years ago tomorrow – the governments of France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands, and Luxembourg signed the “Treaties of Rome”, thereby establishing what would later become the European Union (EU). The “Treaties of Rome” consist of two different treaties: the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community (EEC Treaty) and the Treaty establishing the European […]

Elor Azaria and Alexander Blackman: Adjudication of Unlawful Military Shootings

What impact do prolonged periods of stress and fear have on a soldier’s behavior? Do the horrors of war and terrorist acts justify conduct that would otherwise be unlawful? While such circumstances do not seem to amount to justification for violating the law, it is notable that “exceptional stressors” and constant threats faced by soldiers were recently considered […]

Australia’s National Day

Today, January 26, is Australia Day, a national public holiday in Australia that commemorates the arrival of the “First Fleet” of convict ships that resulted in the establishment of the first British penal colony on the continent. It is considered Australia’s national day. On January 26, 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip raised the British flag at Sydney Cove, a […]