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The Law Library Blog, In Custodia Legis, Named to ABA Journal’s Blawg 100 for Third Time

We are excited that once again In Custodia Legis has been recognized as one of the top 100 best blogs for a legal audience out of more than 4,000 in the ABA Journal’s Blawg Directory.  We were first included in the ABA Journal’s 8th Annual Blawg 100 in 2014.  Then we were fortunate to be listed again […]

Delicious, but Deadly: Should Fugu Liver be Served in Japan?

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering Japan and several other Asian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Sayuri has previously written blog posts about testing of older drivers in Japan, sentencing of parents who kill children, English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws […]

FALQs: The International Criminal Court and Africa

Recently, three African countries initiated a process to withdraw from the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (the Rome Statute).  On October 18, Burundi’s president signed legislation to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (the ICC), the first country to do so.  The following day, South Africa announced its intention to follow suit by […]

Indigenous Rights in New Zealand: Legislation, Litigation, and Protest

While growing up in New Zealand, then attending university there and working as a policy adviser in both environmental and constitutional law, I saw news items and had discussions about Māori rights, activism, and related legal or policy developments fairly regularly. I have therefore followed with interest media articles and social media discussions about the […]

Controversy Over New Egyptian Law that Regulates the Construction of Churches

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, a senior legal research analyst at the Law Library of Congress. George has contributed a number of posts to this blog, including posts on Egypt’s new antiterrorism law, the legal processes available to imprisoned journalists in Egypt, the trial of Seif al Islam al Gaddafi, constitutional […]

FALQs: The Swedish Detention Order Regarding Julian Assange

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg. Elin is a foreign law research consultant who covers Scandinavian countries at the Law Library of Congress. Elin has previously written for In Custodia Legis on diverse topics including Iceland – Global Legal Collection Highlights, Alfred Nobel’s Will: A Legal Document that Might Have Changed the World […]

The Volkswagen Litigation

In September 2015, the German automaker Volkswagen (VW) admitted that it had manipulated software in around eleven million diesel vehicles worldwide to cheat on emissions tests. As more and more details emerged in the ensuing weeks and months, VW’s share value rapidly declined by 30 percent. U.S. regulators levied heavy fines of up to US$15.3 billion […]

New Chinese Rule Legalizing Uber

As described in previous blog posts authored by Jenny and Tariq, the rapid expansion of Uber around the world has presented new challenges to regulators in foreign countries. It is interesting to note that China recently issued a departmental rule regulating “online taxi-booking services.” Effective November 1, 2016, the Interim Administrative Measures for the Business of Online […]

Vice of the Week: Would a Mezcal by Any Other Name Taste as Smoky?

As today is September 16th, which is Mexico’s Independence, it seems fitting to highlight something Mexican. And there’s nothing quite as deeply Mexican as mescal. Many people refer to mescal (or mezcal) as the “tequila with the worm.” In fact, this notion of tequila with a worm is touched upon in the Pura Belpré Award […]