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The Law Library Commemorated Constitution Day with a Book Talk by Professor Michael J. Klarman

The Law Library of Congress commemorated Constitution Day a little early this year with a book talk by Harvard Law Professor Michael J. Klarman on September 12th. Professor Klarman discussed his book, The Framers’ Coup: The Making of the United States Constitution. Prof. Klarman referred to the Philadelphia convention as a coup because the delegates defied their instructions in crafting a new design for a federal government that was much more nationalist and anti-populist in design than the Articles of the Confederation. Despite the Federalists’ success in crafting a strong federal government, the document still had to be ratified by nine of the thirteen states to become operative. Many of these states had enacted populist legislation, such as debtor relief acts, earlier in the decade which was antithetical to the Framers’ view of government. How did the Federalists overcome Anti-Federalist objections to the new model of government? Watch Prof. Klarman discuss how a combination of guile and good fortune on the part of the Federalists led to the ratification of the United States Constitution, a document that has endured to become one of the world’s longest surviving, written charters of government.

2017 AALL Annual Meeting: Our Presentation on Enhancements in Government Legislative Websites

Tariq, Andrew and I, along with other Law Library colleagues, recently participated in the 110th American Association of Law Librarians (AALL) Annual Meeting and Conference.  If you haven not done so yet, check out Andrew’s post on the experiences of our colleagues at the conference. In addition to attending many of the wonderful programs offered, the […]

Pioneering Women in Congress

The following is a guest blog post by Christina Miskey and Allison Bailund, Law Library metadata interns, University of Washington MLIS students, and women’s history buffs. Today is the 97th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. In honor of this culmination of the women’s suffrage […]

Browse Law.gov Content by Topic or Jurisdiction

A few years ago, Andrew mentioned the possibility of adding a page where users could browse by jurisdiction among our different content types.  Our content types include In Custodia Legis, the Guide to Law Online, the Global Legal Monitor, Legal Reports, and other content materials such as research guides. We are adding more content in […]

“Would You Be Interested in Getting (Attorney General) William Wirt’s Head Back?” Rebecca Roberts Brings Us a Tale From the Congressional Cemetery

This is a guest post by Rebecca Boggs Roberts. Rebecca is a program coordinator at Smithsonian Associates, writer, and the former program director for the Historic Congressional Cemetery. In 2003, an unidentified man called the Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. and asked the cemetery manager, “Would you be interested in getting William Wirt’s head back?” The answer, of course, […]

Bringing Congress to the Classroom with a new Educational Resources Page

This is a guest post by Laura Read Lee, a Junior Fellow in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. In this post, Laura describes the new page that she designed, “Bringing Congress to the Classroom.” The Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress has recently launched a new webpage […]