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Enjoy Our New Virtual Meeting Background Featuring a 15th-Century Manuscript

Many of us are still working from home or finding ourselves on modified work-from-home schedules. Why not spruce up your meetings with our new virtual background? This image comes from an illustrated manuscript of the Grand Coutumier de Normandie, from the Law Library’s rare book collection. This 15th-century manuscript, written on leaves of parchment, is an illustrated copy of a private compilation of the customary law of Normandy. It is decorated with seven painted miniatures. The first miniature, a courtroom scene, appears in this image. To use this image, simply right-click on the image and select “save image as…”. Once you have saved the image, upload it as you would any other virtual background picture.

An illustrated copy of a private compilation of the customary law of Normandy. This painted miniature is a courtroom scene with the Law Library of Congress logo.

Virtual meeting background featuring a miniature from the Grand Coutumier de Normandie (France, ca. 1450-1470). Created by Susan Taylor-Pikulsky.

This item is one of many in our rare book collection. If you are interested in learning more about any of the items in our collection, which includes more than 90,000 printed volumes and manuscripts, appointments are available. Rare book service is available on weekdays from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Access to rare materials is by appointment only. For further information, contact Nathan Dorn, Rare Book Librarian, at [email protected] or 202-707-3803.

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