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Remembering the Ancestors for Indigenous People’s Day

Greetings from Piscataway/Pamunkey lands! As Indigenous Peoples Day approached, the blog team discussed writing about the holiday and a new program that is going to air soon. It seemed like a good time to remember some of the earlier residents of this country: the Ancestral Puebloans. Conservators have worked to preserve many of their dwellings in […]

The Murder of Penowanyanquis and the Trial of Arthur Peach, Plymouth, 1638

One of the most vivid criminal trials of seventeenth-century American history celebrated its 380th anniversary a few days ago on Sept. 4. On that day, in 1638, authorities in Plymouth Colony tried Arthur Peach, along with three codefendants, for the murder of a Nipmuc man called Penowanyanquis. The court found the men guilty and sentenced […]

Charles Brent Curtis, first Native American Congressional member

Yesterday, January 25, was the birthday of Charles Brent Curtis, first Native American congressional representative, senator, and the first and only Native American Vice President. Born in 1860 in Kansas to a Kanza mother and a European American father, he was a registered member of the Kaw Nation and was also part Osage and Potawatomi.  […]

Remembering Vine Deloria, Jr.

Vine Deloria, Jr., (b. March 14, 1933-d. November 13, 2005) was a Standing Rock Sioux lawyer, teacher, activist and writer. After completing his schooling, he worked as the executive director for the National Conference of American Indians (NCAI) from 1964-1967, where he advocated for the rights of Native Americans. Shortly after his tenure there, he […]

Modern Tribal Law on the Shelf

Modern Tribal Law On the Shelf During National Native American Heritage Month, Law Library staff trawl the Library’s vast holdings for pertinent material to showcase for its online and onsite visitors. Researchers interested in the month’s origins can also visit the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) page for more information about the history of the […]

Litigating Memory: The Legal Case Behind the Moiwana and Sand Creek Massacres

The following is a guest post by Collection Services Division’s intern Timothy Byram.  Timothy’s interest in Latin American culture led him to one of the Library’s many public programs, piquing his interest in two particular cases which he discusses here. Litigation is defined as a contest in a courtroom realized “for the purpose of enforcing […]