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Braddock’s (Other) Road

If you live and drive in the greater Washington area, you have heard of Braddock Road (VA State Road 620). It’s almost always congested with the heavy traffic that is one of the region’s claims to fame. Virginia is littered with roadways named for early American historical people and battles, and I assumed Braddock was […]

The Home of General Gates & the Plot to Remove Washington as Commander In Chief – Pic of the Week

This is the home of Continental Army General Horatio Gates, which is located in downtown York, Pennsylvania. The structure to the left is a colonial-era tavern. In what is now referred to as the “Conway Cabal,” Gates was championed by General Thomas Conway as a replacement for George Washington as commander in chief following Gates’ […]

Indiana State Library – Pic of the Week

I saw this recent blog post, So, what does the Indiana State Library actually do?, and was reminded of my visit there. The Indiana State Library is across the street from the Indiana State House, similar to the way that the Capitol is across the street from the Library of Congress. One of my favorite places […]

Erskine May – Pic of the Week

Last month I listened to oral arguments of two cases being appealed before the U.K.’s Supreme Court.  The cases, one an appeal from England and Wales and the other an appeal from Scotland,dealt with the U.K. prime minister’s August 2019 decision regarding the prorogation of Parliament. I noticed that the lawyers presenting the cases referred on several […]

Law Establishing the Icelandic Supreme Court – Pic of the Week

October 6, 2019, this coming Sunday, marks the centennial of the Icelandic Law on the Supreme Court of October 6, 1919 (Lög om hæstarjett Nr. 22 af 6 okt. 1919), which provided for the establishment of a Supreme Court in Iceland. The Supreme Court replaced the National Court (Landsyfirréttur), whose decisions could be appealed to the Supreme Court of Denmark. […]

We’re Going to Do Something: Flight 93 National Memorial

One perfectly ordinary, sunny Tuesday morning at the end of summer, four planes headed out on trans-U.S. flights; they never made it to their intended destination. Like the attack on Pearl Harbor and the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, Dr. Martin Luther King, and Robert F. Kennedy, every American beyond primary school age at […]