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Consumer Protection: A Beginner’s Guide

This post is coauthored by Barbara Bavis and Robert Brammer, senior legal reference specialists. Consumer protection touches on a number of areas of law, and as such, has been broadly defined by Nolo’s Plain-English Law Dictionary as “[f]ederal and state laws established to protect retail purchasers of goods and services from inferior, adulterated, hazardous, and […]

FALQs: Vaccination Law in the United States

This post is coauthored by Robert Brammer and Barbara Bavis, senior legal reference specialists. This material is provided for informational purposes only and is not to be considered legal advice. To obtain legal advice, please consult a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction. United States vaccination requirements have been in the news, particularly following what the Centers […]

How to Trace Federal Regulations – A Research Guide

This post is co-written by Anne Guha, who was an intern with the Law Library’s Public Services Division this spring and is now working in Public Services, and Barbara Bavis, legal reference specialist. Our patrons at the Law Library of Congress frequently ask us for assistance in investigating the origins and statutory authority of federal […]

What Do I Wear to Court?: Courtroom Appearance and Decorum Standards

Periodically, we hear about news stories in which an attorney, a party in a legal case, or even a courtroom spectator, find themselves in hot water for not meeting certain courtroom attendance standards.  Apart from avoiding the wrath of judges, appearance can also apparently have an an effect on the outcome of a trial.  In […]

An Introduction to Congress.gov

Barbara Bavis, Ashley Sundin, and I are happy to bring you an introduction to Congress.gov.  This video provides a brief explanation of how to use the new features in the latest release, such as accounts, saved searches, member remarks in the Congressional Record, and executive nominations. If you would like more in-depth training on Congress.gov, we hold bi-monthly […]

A Guide to Chinese Legal Research and Global Legal Collection Highlights: Official Publication of Chinese Law

If you got a chance to read my previous posts on Chinese legal research, Who Makes What? and Administrative Regulations and Departmental Rules, you know that under China’s Law on Legislation, the National People’s Congress (NPC) and its standing committee make laws; the State Council makes administrative regulations; and the ministries and commissions under the […]