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Edith Sampson – Pic of the Week

Saturday, December 3, marks the fifty-fourth anniversary of the day that Edith Spurlock Sampson was sworn in as the first African-American female judge by election. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1901, she graduated from high school and the New York University School of Social Work. One of her professors at the NYU School of Social […]

Today is Women’s Equality Day!

On August 26, 1920, Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby certified the 19th amendment of the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. Thanks to Congresswoman Bella S. Abzug, this landmark moment, and women’s continuous achievements and challenges on the path toward equality under the law are commemorated every August 26 on Women’s […]

FALQs: Saudi Arabia Municipal Elections – Women Participate for the First Time

The following is a guest post by George Sadek, a senior legal research analyst at the Law Library of Congress. George has contributed a number of posts to this blog, including posts on Egypt’s new antiterrorism law, the legal processes available to imprisoned journalists in Egypt, the trial of Seif al Islam al Gaddafi, and […]

Women in History: Lawyers and Judges

In celebration of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8) we thought we’d try something a bit different for the blog. We asked the foreign law specialists, analysts, and interns at the Law Library of Congress to provide responses to a series of questions related to the history of women’s rights in various […]

Women in History: Elected Representatives

In celebration of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8) we thought we’d try something a bit different for the blog. We asked the foreign law specialists, analysts, and interns at the Law Library of Congress to provide responses to a series of questions related to the history of women’s rights in various […]

Women in History: Voting Rights

In celebration of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8) we thought we’d try something a bit different for the blog. We asked the foreign law specialists, analysts, and interns at the Law Library of Congress to provide responses to a series of questions related to the history of women’s rights in various […]

The First Feminist Congress of Mexico

The following blog post was a joint effort by Christina Turiano, Jeffrey Helm, and the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress.  March was Women’s History Month; but as Luis de Góngora y Argote would put it, “Fortune yields goods that are not yet writ: when whistles flutes, when flutes whistles.” The serendipitous act of such a rare find as this can […]