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Try the New Experimental Congress.gov Chrome Browser Extension

Have you ever found yourself reading a news story about legislation, and wished that you could quickly discover the primary source that the article discusses? With that use case in mind, we are excited to bring you an experimental, open source Google Chrome browser extension that will provide you with enhanced access to Congress.gov from third-party webpages, […]

The Protection of Minority and Regional Languages in Germany

Moin (“hello” in Low German)! Today, September 26, 2018, is the European Day of Languages. The European Day of Languages celebrates “linguistic diversity in Europe and promote[s] language learning.” In 2001, the European Union (EU) and the Council of Europe (CoE) jointly organized the European Year of Languages, which turned out to be so successful that […]

Women, Baseball and the Law

The Library of Congress’s Baseball Americana exhibit gives me something new to think about each time I visit. Most intriguing to me (well, right up there with any mentions of Pittsburgh, the Washington Nationals, Bob Dylan, and my friend Patti’s portrait) are the numerous times women are depicted in the exhibit. Two things stand out from […]

Concubinage and the Law in France

The following is a guest post by Sarah Ettedgui, a foreign law intern who worked with foreign law specialist Nicolas Boring at the Global Legal Research Directorate, Law Library of Congress during the summer. If there is one area of the law in which moral and religious ideologies have exercised a profound influence, it is that of relationships between the […]

Trending: Congressional Research Service Reports Now Available Online

This is a guest post by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. It is cross posted on the Library of Congress Blog. I’m pleased to announce that, for the first time, the Library of Congress is providing Congressional Research Service (CRS) reports to the public. The reports are available online at crsreports.congress.gov. Created by experts in CRS, the […]

Congress.gov New, Tip, and Top for September 2018

Andrew recently brought us the second set of enhancements to Congress.gov for August, which included improving the search form by labeling the Words & Phrases search and making it larger. In this release, we are excited to bring you enhanced saved search email alerts that are available for searches performed from the legislation homepage search form and the advanced […]

18th Annual National Book Festival Recap

The Law Library had a dynamic presence at the 18th annual National Book Festival. We had 11 staff members volunteer at the festival from our Global Legal Collection Directorate, Public Services Division, Office of Administrative Operations, and Office of External Relations as well as Maria Soto, a new member of the ABA Standing Committee on the […]

The Murder of Penowanyanquis and the Trial of Arthur Peach, Plymouth, 1638

One of the most vivid criminal trials of seventeenth-century American history celebrated its 380th anniversary a few days ago on Sept. 4. On that day, in 1638, authorities in Plymouth Colony tried Arthur Peach, along with three codefendants, for the murder of a Nipmuc man called Penowanyanquis. The court found the men guilty and sentenced […]