{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

From the Serial Set: Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month and Libraries

In recognition of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Digital Resources Division would like to highlight some of the documented accomplishments of Latin America in our collections. The Serial Set contains bulletins from the Pan American Conferences. Initially known as the International Union of American Republics, the Pan American Union became the Organization of American States (OAS) […]

From the Serial Set: Citizenship and Suffrage for Native Americans

Welcome to the final installment of suffrage stories from the Serial Set! Today, we will be looking at the history of Native American citizenship and how voting rights came into play. Despite the ratification of the 15th Amendment in 1870, Native Americans were not guaranteed citizenship, nor voting rights, under the United States government. Reports from the […]

From the Serial Set: Residency, Race, and Suffrage

Congress has dealt with issues of voter disenfranchisement on the basis of race throughout history. The question of suffrage for District of Columbia residents in 1844 demonstrated how the enfranchisement of D.C. residents and Black American men was interconnected. In that year, the Senate Committee for the District of Columbia, which held jurisdiction over D.C. from 1816 until […]

From the Serial Set: The History of the Minimum Wage

The following is a guest post by Elina Lee, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. In honor of Labor Day, we decided to explore the early history of the federal minimum wage as shown through the United States Congressional Serial Set. According to Serial Set Vol. No. 6857 […]

From the Serial Set: Susan B. Anthony and the National Woman Suffrage Association

In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, the Library of Congress is digitally hosting the exhibit, Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote, through September 2020. As digitization of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set is underway, various bills related to suffrage throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries emerge. These give […]

From the Serial Set: Pride in the Face of Prejudice

June commemorates LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer+) Pride Month, recognizing the anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising on June 28, 1969, which symbolizes the LGBTQ+ rights movement. In the decade prior, before Marsha P. Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, and Stormé DeLarverie gained recognition for their activism, Frank Kameny’s LGBTQ+ activist work grew out of the period of […]

From the Serial Set: Congress and the Territories

The following is a guest post by Bailey DeSimone, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. Her ongoing blog series, From the Serial Set, shares discoveries from the Law Library’s Serial Set Digitization Project. The House Committee on Territories was formed in 1825 during the 1st Session of the 19th […]

From the Serial Set: “Memorials” and an International Copyright Law?

The following is a guest post by Bailey DeSimone, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. “Memorials,” or requests “that the Congress take some action, or refrain from taking certain action,” are housed throughout the United States Congressional Serial Set. These documents provide insight into the communication between citizens – […]

From the Serial Set: “Peculiarities” of Life in D.C. (1880)

The following is a guest post by Bailey DeSimone, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. Washington, D.C. became the capital of the United States of America in 1790. On February 27, 1801, the District of Columbia Organic Act established the city as an unincorporated territory. Throughout the 219 years […]