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17th Century Wardrobe Regulation in the Kingdom of Spain

The following is a guest post by Francesca Marquez, who served as a fall 2021 remote intern transcribing and researching documents in the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign at the Law Library of Congress. If, in the words of Victor Hugo, “curiosity is a sort of gluttony. To see is to devour[,]” then life […]

How Havana Became British … For Eleven Months

The following is a guest post by Silvia Lopez, who served as a fall 2021 remote intern transcribing and researching documents in the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign at the Law Library of Congress. One treasure from the Herencia collection of Spanish legal documents for the 15th -19th centuries is the Brief of Jose Antonio Manso de […]

How Not to Apologize: A Lesson from a 17th Century Hospital in Barcelona

The following is a guest post by Alèxia Devin, who served as a fall 2021 remote intern transcribing and researching documents in the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign at the Law Library of Congress. Special thanks to Francisco Macías for translation and analysis assistance. During my Herencia internship, I transcribed quite a few historical documents that […]

Carlists, Conflicts, and Churches — The Village of Ripoll

The following is a guest post by Anna Weese-Grubb, who served as a fall 2021 remote intern transcribing and researching documents in the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign at the Law Library of Congress. Special thanks to Francisco Macías for translation and analysis assistance. During my time on the Herencia campaign, I’ve seen several […]

From Summorum Pontificum to Traditionis Custodes: Changes in Liturgical Matters at the Catholic Church

The following post is by Dante Figueroa, a senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress. He has recently written for In Custodia Legis on the Italian Parliamentary Library; Spanish Legal Documents (15th to 19th Century); Recent Legislation Enacted by Italy to Tackle COVID-19; and Italy: A New Silk Road Between Italy and China – the Belt and Road Initiative. […]

Meet the Fall 2021 Herencia Interns

This fall, the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress is hosting its third consecutive remote internship program for the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign. Herencia interns are responsible for reviewing, transcribing, and promoting this collection of Spanish legal documents from the 15th – 19th centuries, with the goal of […]

Herencia: 18th Century Marriage Orders and their Consequences

The following is a guest post by Naomi Welikala, who served as a summer 2021 remote intern transcribing and researching documents in the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign at the Law Library of Congress. Throughout my time as one of the Herencia crowdsourcing interns, I have come across a wide variety of themes in […]

Celebrate the Newest Release of Herencia Documents by Participating in our Transcribe-a-thon!

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, and the release of Phase 3 of our crowdsourcing campaign, Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents, the Law Library of Congress will be hosting another entirely virtual transcribe-a-thon from today, Monday, September 27, through Friday, October 1. This event is in collaboration with By the People and the Hispanic Reading Room of […]

Smuggling French Hats into 17th Century Spain: Worth a Fight?

The following is a guest post by Samantha Mendoza, who served as a summer 2021 remote intern transcribing and researching documents in the Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents crowdsourcing campaign at the Law Library of Congress. In present day, it is not uncommon to hear news of attempts to smuggle items across national borders. This can […]