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Boarding School Scandal in Sweden

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a Swedish law specialist working at the Law Library of Congress. Elin was featured in an In Custodia Legis interview on October 19, 2011. What happened? A debate about the existence, operation, and legal aspects of private boarding schools is currently raging in Sweden. Such schools remain […]

Kungliga Biblioteket, National Library of Sweden – Pic of the Week

I was recently in Stockholm where I paid a visit to the National Library of Sweden (Kungliga Biblioteket, or “KB”), which is situated in a very pretty park.  According to its website, the National Library “has been collecting virtually everything printed in Sweden or in Swedish since 1661.”  A brochure about the Library provides an […]

Lappkodicillen of 1751 – the Sami Magna Carta

This year marks the 270th anniversary of the Lapp Codicil of 1751 (Lappkodicillen), a document equally relevant to Sami cross-border relations in Sweden and Norway today as it was in 1751. On September 21, 1751, the Strömstad Treaty between Norway (Denmark) and Sweden (including Finland) was signed. Norway was then a part of Denmark and in an addendum […]

FALQs: England and Wales: Football Banning Orders

The following is a guest post by Chris Brain, a foreign law intern working in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress under the supervision of Clare Feikert-Ahalt, senior foreign law specialist covering the United Kingdom. He has previously written about UK – New Immigration and Asylum Bill Provides Fundamental Reforms. This post is […]

FALQs: Greenlandic Autonomy, Government Formation, and Mineral Resource Policy

This blog post is part of our Frequently Asked Legal Questions series and describes Greenland’s legislative autonomy, government formation process, and mineral resource policy. A few weeks ago I wrote about the government formation process in Sweden. Last month, specifically June 21, marked the National Day of Greenland and the anniversary of the adoption of the […]

On This Day in 1984: Women’s Suffrage in Liechtenstein

On July 1, 1984, women’s suffrage was introduced in Liechtenstein— making it the last European country to do so. Liechtenstein is situated between Switzerland and Austria and has a total of 38,557 inhabitants. In the 1984 national referendum, a slim majority of 2,370 (male) voters (51.3%) approved the right of Liechtenstein women to vote and […]

FALQs: Swedish Government Formation – Votes of No Confidence and Extraordinary Elections

This blog post is part of our Frequently Asked Legal Questions series. On June 17, 2021, the Swedish parliamentary parties the Left Party, the Sweden Democrats, the Christian Democrats, and the Moderates expressed support for a motion for a vote of no confidence (Yrkande om Misstroendeförklaring) against the sitting Prime Minister Stefan Löfven. On June 21, 2021, […]

New Report on Children’s Online Privacy and Data Protection Published

The Law Library recently published a new report on the protection of children online. The report, titled Children’s Online Privacy and Data Protection, surveys ten jurisdictions on the special measures they have put in place to protect children online. The jurisdictions are the European Union (EU) member states of Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Portugal, Spain, […]

LGBTQ Rights in Denmark

This upcoming Saturday, June 5, 2021, marks the Danish National Day (a.k.a. Constitution Day). I have previously marked the day by writing about Danish Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights (2017) and Constitution Day and Election Day in Denmark (2019). This year, I thought I would highlight some laws related to LGBTQ rights in Denmark, […]