{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

100 Years of Women’s Suffrage in Germany

On November 30, 1918—100 years ago today—women in Germany gained the right to vote and stand for election. With the enactment of the Electoral Act (Reichswahlgesetz), the newly formed Council of People’s Representatives—the provisional government—fulfilled its promise made on November 12, 1918, to allow active and passive female suffrage. November 12, 1918, is therefore generally seen as the birth […]

95th Anniversary of Women’s Right to Suffrage in the United States – Pic of the Week

In celebration of the 95th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, today’s pic of the week is from the Library’s Manuscript Division of women suffragist leader Alice Paul with other activists of the National Woman’s Party (NWP). On August 18, 1920, Tennessee General State Assembly member Harry T. Burn, at his mother’s insistence, cast the final vote needed […]

Centennial of the 1913 Suffrage March

As a graduate of Oberlin College, I have always been proud that when Oberlin was established in 1833, it was the first co-educational college in the country, admitting both men and women.  However, it did not initially admit men and women on the same terms: women were not admitted to the baccalaureate program until 1837.   […]

Elizabeth Peratrovich, Civil and Voting Rights Activist

Elizabeth Peratrovich, Tlingit Raven moiety, Lukaax.ádi clan, was born on July 4, 1911, to a Tlingit mother who had to give her up for adoption. She was raised by her adoptive parents, Jean and Andrew Wanamaker, in Sitka, Ketchikan, and Klawock, Alaska. Her parents raised her in a traditional Tlingit lifestyle. Her father, who also […]

Addressing the Gender Gap in Politics: The Case of Germany

In honor of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, I thought I would write something about political parity laws in Germany. Parity laws aim to counter female underrepresentation in parliament and have recently been enacted or are being discussed in a number of German states. Even though German women gained the right to vote […]

On this Day: Gro Harlem Brundtland Becomes First Female Prime Minister in Norway

Forty years ago today, on February 4, 1981, Gro Harlem Brundtland became Norway’s first female prime minister (PM). Erna Solberg, Norway’s current PM, became the second woman to serve as PM when she was elected to this role following the 2013 national election. Norwegian Women’s Suffrage 2019 marked the centennial of women’s suffrage in the […]

Belva Lockwood and the “Legal Disabilities” of Early Women Lawyers

Today, November 30, marks the 140th anniversary of Belva Lockwood becoming the first woman to argue before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1880. The following commemorative post is by Allison Buser, a summer intern with the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. She is a current student of history and library & […]

The Roman Senate as Precursor of the U.S. Senate

The following post is written by Dante Figueroa, a senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress. He has recently written for In Custodia Legis on the Italian Parliamentary Library; Spanish Legal Documents (15th to 19th Century); Recent Legislation Enacted by Italy to Tackle COVID-19; and Italy: A New Silk Road Between Italy and China – the Belt […]