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Centennial of the 1913 Suffrage March

As a graduate of Oberlin College, I have always been proud that when Oberlin was established in 1833, it was the first co-educational college in the country, admitting both men and women.  However, it did not initially admit men and women on the same terms: women were not admitted to the baccalaureate program until 1837.   […]

The Roman Senate as Precursor of the U.S. Senate

The following post is written by Dante Figueroa, a senior legal information analyst at the Law Library of Congress. He has recently written for In Custodia Legis on the Italian Parliamentary Library; Spanish Legal Documents (15th to 19th Century); Recent Legislation Enacted by Italy to Tackle COVID-19; and Italy: A New Silk Road Between Italy and China – the Belt […]

From the Serial Set: Congress and the Territories

The following is a guest post by Bailey DeSimone, a library technician (metadata) in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. Her ongoing blog series, From the Serial Set, shares discoveries from the Law Library’s Serial Set Digitization Project. The House Committee on Territories was formed in 1825 during the 1st Session of the 19th […]

FALQs: Are There Laws That Regulate a Change of Leaders in North Korea?

The following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist covering several countries in East and Southeast Asia at the Law Library of Congress. Her previous In Custodia Legis posts include New Era, New Law Number; Holy Cow – Making Sense of Japanese Wagyu Cow Export Rules; Japanese Criminal Legal System as Seen Through the […]