{ subscribe_url: '/share/sites/library-of-congress-blogs/law.php' }

Election Laws Around the Globe

This is a joint post drafted by Clare Feikert and Margaret Wood. The Global Legal Research Center has done a number of briefings and blogs, as well as too many Global Legal Monitor Articles to list, on electoral law across various jurisdictions around the world. The Russian Federation, Parliamentary Elections: Legal Issues, 2008; Elections in […]

Israel’s Upcoming National Elections: Background Information

Israel is facing national elections shortly after the U.S. elections. Interestingly, Israel was mentioned more than 30 times  in the October 22, 2012 U.S. presidential debate . There is no doubt that the results of either election will have serious ramifications on both countries’ policies in the Middle East. On Oct. 16, 2012, the Knesset (Israel’s parliament) passed the Law for the dissolution […]

Research on Bioethics-Related Laws of Various Countries

Cloning, genetic modification, stem cell research, IVF.  I’m sure that you have seen or heard these terms before in the media, which frequently reports on new treatments for various diseases and conditions, women having babies through surrogates (or multiple babies as a result of fertility treatments), and changes to how our food is produced.  You […]

Global Legal Monitor: August Highlights

Our top most viewed Global Legal Monitor articles in August covered seven different legal areas: Communications and Electronic Information; Constitutional Law; Criminal Law and Procedure; Foreign Investment; Immigration; Labor; and Nationality and Citizenship.  Here is a list of these articles in the order of their popularity: Japan: Stricter Sentences for Sex Offenders   South Korea: Permanent […]

An Interview with Sophia Schick, Foreign Law Intern

This week’s interview is with Sophia Schick.  Sophia is spending time working for the Law Library this summer as an intern in the Global Legal Research Center. In addition to the valuable contribution she is making, Sophia brings tremendous enthusiasm to her work. Describe your background.  I grew up in Meersburg, a small town of five  thousand inhabitants, […]

From Recipient to Donor: The Changing Face of Aid

Over a year ago I visited a remarkable country.  Rich in history, art, culture and beautiful landscapes, this country has traditionally received foreign aid due to its general low income level but is now providing aid to other countries.  I was amazed to see its recent monumental progress in science and technology although it is true […]

Meet Alexander Hoffmann: A Law Library of Congress Patron

The following is a guest post by Megan Lulofs Kuhagen, a Legal Information Analyst in the Public Services Division.  Meg has previously posted on a variety of topics including States in the Senate, House Committee Hearings Video, the Cardiff Giant, the Canadian Library of Parliament, football blackouts, and librarian services. We have interviewed Law Library staff and our colleagues from around the Library of Congress here at In Custodia Legis. But, […]

Happy Birthday William: Shakespeare, Henry V and Salic Law

When Andrew asked me if I would write a post for Shakespeare’s birthday, I enthusiastically agreed.  I had just been rewatching Kenneth Branagh’s film, Henry V and as a dedicated Anglophile thought, this will be easy!  I subsequently realized that as a writer for the Law Library’s blog I would need to write about Shakespeare and the law – […]

Law Library of Congress Hosts Event, Releases Guide on Legal Translation

The following is a guest post by Constance A. Johnson, a Legal Research Analyst at the Law Library’s Global Legal Research Center.  Connie is not new to In Custodia Legis; her recent contributions include Water Rights at Star Island and Human Rights Day Event: Save the Date!.  Enjoy! On Wednesday, March 28, 2012, I attended a two […]