Top of page

Search results for: Germany

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

FALQs: Danish and Swedish Response to the Current Refugee Crisis– Part I

Posted by: Ruth Levush

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law research consultant who covers Scandinavian countries at the Law Library of Congress. Elin is a prolific writer and has previously written for In Custodia Legis on diverse topics including What’s in an Icelandic (Legal) Name?, Glad Syttonde Mai! Celebration of the Bicentenary of the …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

An Interview with Robert Patrick, Director of the Veterans History Project

Posted by: Kelly Buchanan

Once again, for Veterans Day, we decided to highlight the Veterans History Project (VHP) of the Library of Congress American Folklife Center. The VHP was established following the passage of the Veterans’ Oral History Project Act in October 2000, with the primary purpose of collecting “video and audio recordings of personal histories and testimonials of American …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

FALQs: The European Union’s Approach to the Current Refugee Crisis

Posted by: Ruth Levush

The following is a guest post by Theresa Papademetriou, a senior foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress who covers the European Union, Greece, Cyprus and Council of Europe. Theresa has previously blogged on “European Union Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights,” “European Union: Where is the Beef?,” “New Greek Regulation Designed to Fight Tax Evasion Problem: Will …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

On the Shelf: Das Osterreichische Recht

Posted by: Betty Lupinacci

The newest entry in our On the Shelf series is one of my favorites: Das Österreichische Recht. Well favorite may not be the right word. Those few of us who have had the pleasure of working with this title both love and fear it. Das Osterreichische Recht is a 113 volume looseleaf set containing the …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

Recap of the IALL 2015 Conference in Berlin

Posted by: Jenny Gesley

I recently returned from the annual conference of the International Association of Law Libraries (IALL), which took place in Berlin, Germany from September 20 to September 24, 2015. This year’s conference, “Within and in between: German Legal Tradition in Times of Internationalization and Beyond,” was held at the Berlin State Library (Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin), which is …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

An Interview with Timothy Byram, Collection Services Intern

Posted by: Betty Lupinacci

Today’s interview is with Timothy Byram, an intern in the Collection Services Division. Describe your background. I was born and raised in central Arkansas until I was 12, at which point my family moved to Lynchburg, Virginia. I have lived in Virginia since, except for the year I took to teach English in Mexico before …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

FALQs: The Greek Debt Crisis – Part 1

Posted by: Jenny Gesley

This blog post is part of our Frequently Asked Legal Questions series. On July 8, 2015, the new Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos submitted a request for a third loan package to the European Stability Mechanism (ESM). The ESM was set up in 2012 as a permanent intergovernmental organization under public international law to issue debt instruments …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

House of Lords Case Records Become (Micro)Film Stars

Posted by: Betty Lupinacci

The following is a guest post by Agata Tajchert, one of the collections technicians in the Processing Section of the Law Library’s Collection Services Division.  Agata heads up our preservation efforts to microfilm material that is too fragile to remain in paper form. A few years ago, after a major inventorying project, the Law Library’s …

Ornate red and ivory wall decoration, with plaque and symbols

The Sinking of the Lusitania

Posted by: Robert Brammer

On May 1, 1915, the RMS Lusitania set sail from New York City to Liverpool, England, carrying 1,959 passengers. On May 7, 1915, the ship was sailing off the Irish coast when a German U-Boat, U-20, fired a torpedo that sank the Lusitania within twenty minutes, killing 1,198 passengers, including 128 Americans. The sinking of …